Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 3 OF 9

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Impact of Drinking Water Treatment on Assimilable Organic Carbon.
Author Mogren, E. M. ; Scarpino, P. V. ; Summers., R. S. ;
CORP Author Cincinnati Univ., OH. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.;Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.
Publisher 1990
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA-68-03-4038; EPA/600/D-90/211;
Stock Number PB91-137141
Additional Subjects Potable water ; Bacteria ; Biodeterioration ; Sewage treatment ; Technology assessment ; Water chemistry ; Humus ; Ozonization ; Water pollution ; Ohio River ; Delaware River ;
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB91-137141 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/13/1991
Collation 19p
Abstract
Regrowth in the drinking water distribution system is a primary concern for water utilities. The disinfection process, although normally efficient for primary inactivation, is not always enough to discourage microbial regrowth if sufficient substrate is available. Previously, the available substrate in drinking water has been assessed by culturing the sample with suspended bacterial seeds at specific counts and relating increased bacterial counts to a concentration of a specific substrate. Besides being labor intensive, this approach, termed assimilable organic carbon (AOC), does not account for the indigenous bacterial population or the biofilm aspects of degradation. Joret et al. and Gimbel and Maelzer overcame these problems by using indigenous populations attached to a sand media and measuring decreases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC); Joret et al. in a batch system and Gimbel and Maelzer in a recirculating batch reactor. Both systems were site specific i.e., the acclimated biofilm and samples were from the same treatment plant. The objectives of the study were to develop, assess and demonstrate a non-site specific system for the determination of the biodegradable DOC concentration in drinking water, and show applications to samples from several treatment plants.