Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 2 OF 2

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Special Report on Ingested Inorganic Arsenic: Skin Cancer; Nutritional Essentiality.
Author Levine, T. ; Rispin, A. ; Scott, C. S. ; Marcus, W. ; Chen, C. ;
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Research and Development.
Publisher Jul 88
Year Published 1988
Report Number EPA/625/3-87/013F;
Stock Number PB89-125975
Additional Subjects Water pollution ; Arsenic ; Hazardous materials ; Toxicity ; Trace elements ; Skin neoplasms ; Carcinogens ; Humans ; Taiwan ; Exposure ; Epidemiology ; Metabolism ; Health effects ; Risk assessment
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB89-125975 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 03/14/1989
Collation 136p
Abstract
A Technical Panel of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Risk Assessment Forum has studied three special issues regarding certain health effects, particularly skin cancer, associated with arsenic ingestion: the validity of the Tseng et al. (1968) study of skin cancer in Taiwan and its use for dose-response assessment in the U.S. population; the interpretation and use of skin lesions reported as arsenic-induced skin cancers in that study; and the role of arsenic as an essential nutrient in the human diet. The Technical Panel also reviewed auxiliary information on genotoxicity, metabolism, and other factors that might suggest the most appropriate approach to dose-response assessment. In brief summary, the analysis shows a causal relationship between ingestion exposure to arsenic and an increased risk of skin cancer in the Taiwan population. This leads to a classification of arsenic as a Group A human carcinogen under EPA's cancer guidelines. However, in the absence of fully persuasive evidence for any of the possible mechanisms of arsenic-induced carcinogenesis, a generalized multistage model that is linear at low doses was used to place an upper bound on the expected human cancer dose-response.