Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 4 OF 4

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Urban soil erosion and sediment control.
Author Powel, Mel D. ; Winte, William C. ; Bodwitc, William P.
CORP Author National Association of Counties Research Foundation.
Publisher U.S. Federal Water Quality Administration : For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O.,
Year Published 1970
Report Number FWQA-15030-DTL; 02276,; 15030-DTL-05/70
Stock Number PB-196 111
OCLC Number 54482958
Subjects Soil erosion--United States. ; Soil conservation--United States. ; Water--Pollution--United States.
Additional Subjects ( Soil erosion ; Urban areas) ; ( Sedimentation ; Control) ; Watersheds ; Management planning ; Water pollution ; Water law ; Water resources ; Surface water runoff ; Reviews
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EMBD MF PB-196111 NRMRL/GWERD Library/Ada,OK 05/07/2004
NTIS  PB-196 111 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 01/01/1988
Collation v, 35 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm.
Abstract
The study was conducted to determine the causes and the extent of urban and suburban soil erosion and sediment problems, and to describe ways in which local communities can organize and implement effective sedimentation control programs. An evaluation is provided on the state-of-the-art of urban sedimentation control, and a series of research needs in the sedimentation field is cited. In addition, this report includes the 'Community Action Guidebook for Soil Erosion and Sediment Control' which describes methods by which local governments can organize, plan, finance, staff, and implement urban sedimentation control programs. Aspects of areawide approaches, legal authority, and public support for sedimentation control are discussed, and an action plan is outlined. It was found that soil erosion and sediment in developing areas is extensive, and that these problems pose significant threats to both soil and water resources. While many of the required technical means for controlling sedimentation problems already exist, new administrative approaches are needed which accommodate the diversity of interests and pressures associated with urban and suburban development. (WRSIC Abstract).
Notes
"15030DTL05/70." Microfiche.