Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 15 OF 22

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Joint Action of O3 and SO2 in Modifying Plant Gas Exchange.
Author Olszyk, D. M. ; Tingey, D. T. ;
CORP Author Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR. ;California Univ., Riverside. Statewide Air Pollution Research Center.
Year Published 1986
Report Number EPA/600/J-86/394;
Stock Number PB88-104278
Additional Subjects Plant physiology ; Sulfur dioxide ; Ozone ; Air pollution ; Water vapor ; Exposure ; Plant metabolism ; Toxicity ; Peas ; Reprints ; Air pollution effects(Plants) ; Gas exchange ; Mass balance ; Stomata ; Synergism
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
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Status
NTIS  PB88-104278 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/21/1988
Collation 7p
Abstract
The joint action of O3 and SO2 stress on plants was investigated. Gas exchange measurements of O3, SO2, and H2O vapor were made for garden pea. Plants were grown under controlled environments; O3, SO2, H2O vapor fluxes were evaluated with a whole-plant gas exchange chamber using the mass-balance approach. Maximum O3 and SO2 fluxes per unit area into leaves averaged 8 nanomoles per square meter per second with exposure to either O3 or SO2 at 0.1 microliters per liter. Internal fluxes of either O3 or SO2 were reduced by up to 50% during exposure to combined versus individual pollutants; the greatest reduction occurred with simultaneous versus sequential combinations of the pollutants. Stomatal conductance to H2O was substantially altered by the pollutant exposures, with O3 molecules twice as effective as SO2 molecules in inducing stomatal closure. Stomatal conductance was related to the integrated dose of pollutants. When O3 was present at the start of the exposure, then stomatal response resembled that for O3 more than the response for SO2. The study indicated that stomatal responses with combinations of O3 and SO2 are not dependent solely on the integrated dose of pollutants, but suggests that a metabolic synergistic effect exists. (Copyright (c) Plant Physiology (1986)82, 401-405.)