Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 7 OF 12

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Plant Uptake of Pentachlorophenol from Sludge-Amended Soils.
Author Bellin, C. A. ; O'Connor, G. A. ;
CORP Author New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. Dept. of Agronomy and Horticulture.;Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.
Publisher c1990
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA/600/J-90/450;
Stock Number PB91-177311
Additional Subjects Sewage sludge ; Sludge disposal ; Soil contamination ; Plants(Botany) ; Farm crops ; Pesticides ; Chlorine organic compounds ; Waste disposal ; Path of pollutants ; Land pollution ; Ground disposal ; Food chains ; Toxic substances ; Reprints ; Phenol/pentachloro
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB91-177311 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 09/04/1991
Collation 7p
Abstract
A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effects of sludge on plant uptake of 14C-pentachlorophenol (PCP). Plants included all fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), lettuce (Latuca sativa L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), and chile pepper (Capsicum annum L.). Minimal intact PCP was detected in the fescue and lettuce by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. No intact PCP was detected in the carrot tissue extracts. Chile pepper was not analyzed for intact PCP because methylene chloride extracts contained minimal 14C. The GC/MS analysis of soil extracts at harvest suggests a half-life of PCP of about 10 d independent of sludge rate or PCP loading rate. Rapid degradation of PCP in the soil apparently limited PCP availability to the plant. Bioconcentration factors (dry plant wt./initial soil PCP concentration) based on intact PCP were <0.01 for all crops, suggesting little PCP uptake. Thus, food-chain crop PCP uptake in these alkaline soils should not limit land application of sludge.