Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 31 OF 31

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Trace Metals in Atmospheric Deposition: A Review and Assessment.
Author Galloway, J. N. ; Thornton, J. D. ; Norton, S. A. ; Volchok, H. L. ; McLean, R. A. N. ;
CORP Author Virginia Univ., Charlottesville. Dept. of Environmental Sciences. ;Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Roseville. ;Maine Univ. at Orono. Dept. of Geological Sciences. ;Department of Energy, New York. Environmental Measurements Lab.;Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
Year Published 1982
Report Number EPA/600/J-82/451;
Stock Number PB86-133055
Additional Subjects Trace elements ; Metals ; Air pollution ; Reviews ; Assessments ; Concentration(Composition) ; Water pollution ; Air water interfaces ; Sediments ; Trends ; Urban areas ; Rural areas ; Tables(Data) ; Reprints ; Wet deposition ; Dry deposition ; Toxic substances ; Natural emissions ; Heavy metals
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB86-133055 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 06/21/1988
Collation 25p
Abstract
Information on nineteen metals in atmospheric deposition potentially toxic to humans and other organisms was evaluated to conclude if metal concentrations are increasing in atmospheric deposition and if these concentrations threaten human or organism health. On the basis of rates of emission, atmospheric concentrations, and known temporal trends, in deposition, Ag, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, Se, and Zn can be expected to show the greatest increases due to human activity with little or no increases expected for Co, Mn, Ni, and Tl. The limited data available supported these expectations. In some cases, dry fallout was found to be significant relative to wet deposition. Of the metals studied only As, Hg, Se and possible Cd are in the vapor phase in the atmosphere. Relative to the impact of these increased concentrations, Hg and Pb are now being deposited in some areas at levels toxic to humans and Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn at levels toxic to other organisms. (Copyright (c) 1982 Pergamon Press Ltd.)