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RECORD NUMBER: 6 OF 24

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Comparative Sensitivity of Neurobehavioral Tests for Chemical Screening.
Author Moser, V. C. ; MacPhail., R. C. ;
CORP Author Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC. ;NSI Technology Services Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Publisher c1990
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA/600/J-90/228;
Stock Number PB91-117101
Additional Subjects Toxicology ; Nervous system ; Food deprivation ; Water deprivation ; Reprints ; Toxic substances ; Motor activity ; Operant conditioning ; Dose-response relationships ; Functional observational battery
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB91-117101 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 03/04/1991
Collation 12p
Abstract
Guidelines for conducting neurobehavioral tests of motor activity, schedule-controlled operant performance, and a functional observational battery (FOB) were published by the U.S. EPA Office of Toxic Substances (1985). A specific FOB protocol has been utilized in conjunction with motor activity measured in a figure-eight maze and performance maintained under a fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement to determine the acute effects of chemicals which produce different syndromes of intoxication in rats (chlordimeform, carbaryl, pentobarbital, triadimefon, nicotine, and 3-acetyl pyridine). In all cases, the lowest effective dose identified using the FOB was equal to or less than that provided by motor activity and operant tests. For most compounds, motor activity and operant performance were equally sensitive. Nicotine and triadimefon, however, increased the rate of operant responding at doses lower than those required to affect motor activity. The time course of each chemical appeared similar across tests with one exception. 3-Acetyl pyridine produced clear effects in the FOB throughout testing (up to 3 weeks) whereas recovery was evident within one week using motor activity and operant performance. (Copyright (c) 1990 by Intox Press, Inc.)