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RECORD NUMBER: 2 OF 7

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Atmospheric Deposition to Mountain Forest Systems: Workshop Proceedings April 1984.
Author Mohnen, V. A. ;
CORP Author State Univ. of New York at Albany. Atmospheric Sciences Research Center.;National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.;Environmental Sciences Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Year Published 1984
Report Number EPA/600/9-84/023;
Stock Number PB84-246412
Additional Subjects Acidity ; Precipitation(Meteorology) ; Air pollution ; Forestry ; Meetings ; Monitoring ; Chemical properties ; Clouds(Meteorology) ; Wind(Meteorology) ; Elevation ; Hardwoods ; Mountains ; Fir trees ; Mortality ; Climatic changes ; Environmental impacts ; Cost estimates ; Canada ; Europe ; Acid precipitation ; Spruce trees
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB84-246412 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 06/23/1988
Collation 72p
Abstract
The Atmospheric Sciences Research Center of the State University of New York-Albany organized and hosted a workshop which specifically addressed the need, design and implementation of research, development and monitoring with advanced techniques for these purposes: (a) to identify the contribution of acidic and non-acidic pollutant deposition to damage of forests on mountain peaks; and (b) to monitor air and cloud chemical quality in regional transport winds for possible source-receptor model evaluation. This report presents the results of the workshop which was held on April 5-7, 1984. The international aspect of this workshop involved Canadian and European scientists and institutions. The workshop participants recommended the establishment of a research and monitoring network extending from the Smoky Mountains to the Laurentian Mountains where forest and atmospheric scientists can study and test in detail the major hypotheses that have been developed in attempts to explain the current decline of forests.