Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 4 OF 8

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Outbreak of Waterborne Giardiasis Associated with Heavy Water Runoff Due to Warm Weather and Volcanic Ashfall.
Author Weniger, B. G. ; Blaser, M. J. ; Gedrose, J. ; Lippy, E. C. ; Juranek, D. D. ;
CORP Author Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC. ;Oregon Dept. of Human Resources, Portland. ;Colorado Univ., Denver. School of Medicine. ;Veterans Administration Hospital, Denver, CO. ;Montana State Dept. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Helena.
Year Published 1983
Report Number EPA-600/J-83-056;
Stock Number PB84-102532
Additional Subjects Giardiasis ; Gastrointestinal diseases ; Infectious diseases ; Montana ; Surface water runoff ; Ashes ; Reprints ; Red Lodge(Montana) ; Giardia lamblia ; Water runoff
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB84-102532 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 06/23/1988
Collation 7p
Abstract
From mid-June through early August 1980, an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness in Red Lodge, Montana affected approximately 780 persons, as estimated from attack rates of 33 percent and 15 percent in urban and rural residents, respectively. Giardia lamblia was identified in stool specimens from 51 per cent of 47 persons with a history of untreated gastrointestinal illness and in 13 per cent of 24 specimens from asymptomatic persons. The epidemic curve was bimodal with peaks in mid-June and mid-July. Each peak occurred about three weeks after an episode of very heavy water runoff resulting from warm sunny weather and snow darkended by ashfall from the Mt. St. Helens volcanic eruption of May 18, 1980. Unfiltered and inadequately chlorinated surface water was supplied by the city water system. Which was implicated as the vehicle of transmission in the outbreak. Water systems providing unfiltered surface water are more likely to become contaminated during periods of heavy water runoff.