Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 4 OF 11

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Evaluation of the Multiple Source Gaussian Plume Diffusion Model - Phase II.
Author Koch, Robert C. ; Thayer., Scott D. ;
CORP Author Geomet, Inc., Gaithersburg, Md.;National Environmental Research Center, Research Triangle Park, N.C. Meteorology Lab.
Year Published 1975
Report Number GEOMET-EF-467; EPA-68-02-0281; EPA/650/4-75-018-b;
Stock Number PB-249 729
Additional Subjects Air pollution ; Urban areas ; Atmospheric diffusion ; Concentration(Composition) ; Sulfur dioxide ; Particles ; Mathematical models ; Diurnal variations ; Periodic variations ; Weather observations ; Atmospheric temperature ; Industrial wastes ; Atmospheric sounding ; Meteorological balloon ; Estimates ; Air circulation ; Gaussian plume model
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=20015V1T.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB-249 729 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation 61p
Abstract
The report summarizes work done to compare a computer model for estimating air pollution concentrations from multiple sources with measured SO2 and particulate concentrations and with other model calculations. The model is capable of estimating short-term and long-term concentrations, and produces results which are equivalent in validity to results produced with other models. Since the model represents hourly variations in both emissions and meteorological condition, the report considers available sources of data and how these can best be used to estimate parameters for the model. Use of temperature and industrial and commercial activity indexes to estimate seasonal and diurnal variations in emissions is discussed. Use of slow-rise balloon soundings taken in urban areas is discussed as a possible supplement to conventional weather data. Finally, the applicability of using sampled calculations when estimating short-term maximum concentrations is evaluated.