Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 2 OF 2

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Terminal Arbors of Axons Projecting to the Somatosensory Cortex of the Adult Rat. 2. The Altered Morphology of Thalamocortical Afferents Following Neonatal Infraorbital Nerve Cut (Journal Version).
Author Jensen, K. F. ; Killackey, H. P. ;
CORP Author Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC. ;California Univ., Irvine.
Publisher c1987
Year Published 1987
Report Number EPA/600/J-87/396;
Stock Number PB89-106025
Additional Subjects Cerebral cortex ; Rats ; Laboratory animals ; Morphology ; Reprints ; Neurology ; Terminal arbors
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB89-106025 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 03/14/1989
Collation 11p
Abstract
The organization of the whisker representation within the neocortex of the rat is dependent on an intact periphery during development. To further investigate how alterations in the cortical map arise the authors examined the organization of thalamocortical afferents to the whiskers representation in adult animals in which the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve was cut on the day of birth. The disrupted pattern of thalamocortical projections to the vibrissae representation was apparent in the abnormal pattern of the anterograde transport of horseradish peroxidase from the thalamus, as well as in the abnormal pattern of succinate dehydrogenase activity. To determine the morphology of individual thalamocortical axons associated with the disrupted pattern, terminal arbors were 'bulk-labeled' by injections of horseradish peroxidase into the white matter beneath the somatosensory cortex. Terminal arbors were identified by their laminar distribution of boutons corresponding to the specific thalamocortical afferent. The medial to lateral extent of these terminal arbors varied dramatically, from 350 to 1500 micrograms. (Copyright (c) 1987 Society for Neuroscience.)