Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 44 OF 74

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Kidney Morphology and Function in the Young of Rats Malnourished and Exposed to Nitrofen during Pregnancy.
Author Chase-Deesing, C. ; Kavlock, R. J. ; Zeman, F. J. ;
CORP Author California Univ., Davis. Dept. of Nutrition.;Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Year Published 1986
Report Number EPA-R-810526; EPA/600/J-86/216;
Stock Number PB87-169629
Additional Subjects Kidney functioning tests ; Toxicity ; Nutritional deficiencies ; Pregnancy ; Exposure ; Laboratory animals ; Morphology ; Reprints ; Nitrofen ; Prenatal exposure delayed effects ; Protein deficiency
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB87-169629 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 06/21/1988
Collation 23p
Abstract
The separate and combined effects of prenatal protein deficiency (65 casein) and prenatal nitrofen exposure (12.5 mg/kg on gestational days 7-21) on renal morphology in the 21-day fetal and postnatal rat were examined. Maternal protein deprivation reduced maternal feed intake, feed efficiency, weight gain, and the number of litters produced at term. Numbers of nature glomeruli, creatinine clearance, water diuresis, and response to ADH, but not the hydropenic response, were lower in the PPD neonates. These changes in morphology and function suggest that prenatal protein deficiency delays renal development and possibly results in a decrease in glomerular clearance and in tubular response to a water load and to anti-diuretic hormone. Evaluation of postnatal renal function showed that prenatal nitrofen exposure depressed the ability to excrete excess water, the response to ADE, and urine concentrating ability. The functional deficits indicate tubular dysfunction, but little or no effect on glomerular function. Renal dysfunction may contribute to the increased mortality in PPD+nitrofen pups by reducing the ability to respond to stress, but the effects are not sufficiently marked to be considered the primary cause of death. (Copyright (c) 1986 by Hemisphere Publishing Corporation.)