Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 37 OF 46

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Results of ocean diffusion and biological studies of the Hollywood, Florida, ocean outfall,
Author Crane, John D. ; Jones., Richard H.
CORP Author Hollywood, Fla.;Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C. Office of Research and Development.;Environmental Science and Engineering, Inc., Gainesville, Fla.
Publisher E.P.A., Office of Research and Development,
Year Published 1976
Report Number EPA-600/3-76-003
Stock Number PB-247 684
OCLC Number 15236242
Additional Subjects Water pollution ; Coliform bacteria ; Outfall sewers ; Ocean environments ; Aerobic processes ; Sewage treatment ; Concentration(Composition) ; Diffusion ; Mortality ; Ecology ; Algae ; Aquatic microbiology ; Dyes ; Seasonal variations ; Pompano Beach ; Ocean bottom ; Protozoa ; Surface waters ; Florida ; Ocean dumping ; Hollywood(Florida) ; Atlantic Ocean
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EKAM  GC1085.C72 1976y Region 4 Library/Atlanta,GA 04/01/1994
NTIS  PB-247 684 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 01/01/1988
Collation 98 p. illus.
Abstract
Full-scale diffusion experiments were conducted to estimate coliform bacteria concentration patterns of sewage effluent from two ocean outfalls located at Pompano Beach and Hollywood, Florida. The experiments consisted of two parts: turbulent diffusion of sewage effluent, and natural die-off of coliform bacteria. Further studies were conducted before, during, and after construction of the Hollywood, Florida, ocean outfall to determine the outfall's effect on ocean ecology. For the majority of the diffusion experiments, Rhodamine dye was injected at a continuous rate into the sewage at the sewage treatment plants. The data indicated that, for the travel times of interest, initial dye concentrations can be reduced by a factor as high as 1,000. Experimental determinations of coliform die-off rates indicated that during the summer months the natural die-off is approximately two orders of magnitude greater than that during the winter. The biological studies consisted of qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the microscopic algae and protozoa of the surface waters and the ocean floor to a distance of about two miles from shore.