Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 7 OF 18

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Extreme weather, health, and communities : interdisciplinary engagement strategies /
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Steinberg, Sheila L.,
Sprigg, William A.,
Berry, Peter,
Porter, Olivia Burchett,
Driscoll, David L.,
Hayden, Mary H.,
Hayes, Michael J.
Jackson, Richard,
Johnson, Daniel P.
Krajeski, Richard L.,
Kuligowski, Erica D.,
Laska, Shirley B.,
Lombardo, Franklin T.,
Luber, George,
Boustead, Barbara Mayes,
Moodian, Margaret M.,
Moodian, Michael A.,
Nadeau, Kari,
Peterson, Kristina J.,
Phan, Long T.
Philippe, Rosina,
Prunicki, Mary M.,
Richardson, Gregory R. A.,
Robinson, David A.,
Shukla, Jyotsana,
Stanforth, Austin C.,
Wall, Nicole,
Wilhelmi, O.
Publisher Springer,
Year Published 2016
OCLC Number 936532883
ISBN 3319306243; 9783319306247
Subjects Climatic extremes--Social aspects. ; Climatic extremes--Health aspects. ; Weather--Effect of human beings on.
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJBM  QC981.8.C53E98 2016 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 09/21/2016
Collation xxi, 388 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.
Notes
Contains bibliographical references.
Contents Notes
This volume presents a unique interdisciplinary approach, drawing on expertise in both the natural and social sciences. A primary goal is to present a scientific and socially integrated perspective on place-based community engagement, extreme weather, and health. Each year extreme weather is leading to natural disasters around the world and exerting huge social and health costs. The International Monetary Fund (2012) estimates that since 2010, 700 worldwide natural disasters have affected more than 450 million people around the globe. The best coping strategy for extreme weather and environmental change is a strong offense. Communities armed with a spatial understanding of their resources, risks, strengths, weaknesses, community capabilities, and social networks will have the best chance of reducing losses and achieving a better outcome when extreme weather and disaster strikes.