Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 4 OF 18

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Nationwide assessment of receiving water impacts from urban stormwater pollution : Volume I : Summary /
Author Heaney, James P. ; Huber, Wayne C. ; Lehman, Melvin E.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Huber, Wayne Charles.
Lehman, Melvin E.
CORP Author Florida Univ., Gainesville. Dept. of Environmental Engineering Sciences.;Municipal Environmental Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH. Wastewater Research Div.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
Year Published 1981
Report Number EPA/600/2-81/025; EPA-R-805663
Stock Number PB81-161812
OCLC Number 48839482
Subjects Runoff. ; Water--Pollution.
Additional Subjects Surface water runoff ; Water pollution ; Urban areas ; Assessments ; Water flow ; Dilution ; Streams ; Environmental impacts ; Tables(Data) ; Evaluation ; States(United States)
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100OR46.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ESAD  EPA 600-2-81-025 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 08/02/2017
NTIS  PB81-161812 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation 153 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Abstract
Results of this nationwide search for documented case studies of impacts of urban runoff on receiving waters indicate that well-documented cases are scarce. Impacts previously attributed to urban stormwater runoff may be point source impacts in disguise, or they may be masked by greater contributions from other sources. Results for every urbanized area in the United States have been summarized by the quantity or urban runoff, the available dilution capacity in the primary receiving water, the number of times the urban area was cited as having a 'problem', the type of receiving waters, the impaired beneficial uses, and the problem pollutants. The report results suggest the need to intensify monitoring programs so that receiving water impacts can be more realistically evaluated.
Notes
Microfiche;