Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 13 OF 19

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Reductive Dechlorination of Dichlorophenols by Nonadapted and Adapted Microbial Communities in Pond Sediments.
Author Hale, D. D. ; Rogers, J. E. ; Wiegel, J. ;
CORP Author Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA. ;Technology Applications, Inc., Athens, GA. ;Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Microbiology.
Publisher c1990
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA/600/J-90/455;
Stock Number PB91-183343
Additional Subjects Dechlorination ; Water pollution control ; Anaerobic processes ; Sediments ; Ponds ; Microbial degradation ; Biodeterioration ; DCP 2-4 herbicide ; Chlorine organic compounds ; Sewage sludge ; Sediment-water interfaces ; Soil surveys ; Aquifers ; Reprints ; Phenol/dichloro
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB91-183343 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 09/04/1991
Collation 14p
Abstract
Fresh and dichlorophenol (DCP)-adapted sediments from two ponds near Athens GA exhibited distinctly different dechlorinating activities. These differences centered on the relative rates of reductive dechlorination in both fresh and adapted sediments and on the substrate specificity of the adapted sediments. Fresh Cherokee Trailer Park Pond sediment dechlorinated 2,3-, 2,4- and 2,6-DCP to monochlorophenols at a faster rate and after a shorter lag period than fresh Bolton's Pond sediment. Lag periods were not observed in either Cherokee or Bolton's sediments that had been adapted to dechlorinate either 2,3-, 2,4- or 2,6-DCP. Adapted Cherokee sediments exhibited faster dechlorinating rates and a broader substrate specificity than the adapted Bolton's sediments. The broad substrate specificity of each of the adapted Cherokee sediments contrasted sharply with the narrow specificity of the 2,6-DCP-adapted Bolton's sediment. The preference for reductive dechlorination was ortho>meta or para in sediments from both ponds. (Copyright (c) Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990.)