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RECORD NUMBER: 20 OF 37

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Inhalation Studies of Mt. St. Helens Volcanic Ash in Animals. 1. Introduction and Exposure System.
Author Graham, J. A. ; Miller, F. J. ; Davies, D. W. ; Hiteshew, M. E. ; Walsh, L. C. ;
CORP Author Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC. ;Northrop Services, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Year Published 1985
Report Number EPA/600/J-85/128;
Stock Number PB86-100203
Additional Subjects Toxicology ; Volcanic ejecta ; Deposition ; Respiration ; Rats ; Laboratory animals ; Reprints ; Air pollution effects(Animals) ; Inhalation provocation tests
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB86-100203 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/21/1988
Collation 12p
Abstract
Due to the lack of information on the effects of inhaled Mt. St. Helens volcanic ash and its potential interaction with sulfur dioxide (SO2), animal studies were performed to determine the acute and chronic health effects of a short-term exposure. This paper describes the inhalation exposure system designed for these studies and theoretically compares the pulmonary deposition in the rats to that in humans. Considering the similarities and differences in regional pulmonary deposition in humans and animals, inhalation studies were performed with fine-mode (<2.5 um aerodynamic diameter, Dae) ash. Comparisons to coarse-mode (>2.5 um Dae) ash were made using intatracheal instillation. A whole-body exposure system was designed to provide inhalation exposures of animals to Mt. St. Helens volcanic ash. SO2, or a combination of both. All exposures were conducted using fine-mode ash samples generated by a Wright dust feed mechanism at a mean concentration of 9.4 mg/m3 (plus or minus) 1.0 SD. Sulfur dioxide was maintained at 2.5 mg/m3 (plus or minus) 0.13 SD. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray fluorescence were used to characterize the ash. (Copyright (c) 1985, Academic Press, Inc.)