Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 5 OF 10

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title National Assessment of the Urban Particulate Problem. Volume XI. Cincinnati, Ohio.
Author Galkiewicz, Rebecca C. ; Lynn, David A. ; Record., Frank ;
CORP Author GCA Corp., Bedford, Mass. GCA Technology Div.;Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N.C. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
Year Published 1976
Report Number GCA-TR-76-25-G(11); EPA-68-02-1376; EPA/450/3-76/026i;
Stock Number PB-268 012
Additional Subjects Particles ; Assessments ; Concentration(Composition) ; Meteorology ; Urban areas ; Regulations ; Topography ; Climatology ; Land use ; Employment ; Populations ; Manufacturing ; Industrial wastes ; Combustion products ; Mathematical models ; Law enforcement ; Atmospheric motion ; Exhaust emissions ; Monitoring ; Sites ; Sampling ; Management planning ; Air pollution control ; Ohio ; Cincinnati(Ohio) ; Air quality ; Point sources ; Air pollution sampling
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB-268 012 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 06/23/1988
Collation 97p
Abstract
This document is one volume of a sixteen-volume report presenting an overall assessment of the particulate problem, which was conducted by GCA/Technology Division for EPA. This particular document is one of fourteen single-area volumes that provide working summaries of data gathered in the fourteen urban areas studied. These city reports primarily provide documentation and background information for Volume I of the study - National Assessment of the Particulate Problem - Final Report (PB-263 665). Volume I should be considered the primary output of the report. The City of Cincinnati is located in Hamilton County in the southwestern corner of the State of Ohio. Due to its location on the Ohio River and its proximity to the coal fields of West Virginia, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, Cincinnati has become an important transportation and manufacturing center whose most important fuel has traditionally been coal. The city is adjacent to a number of smaller, independent communities which are also highly industrialized.