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RECORD NUMBER: 2 OF 15

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Association of Marginal Folate Depletion with Increased Human Chromosomal Damage In vivo: Demonstration by Analysis of Micronucleated Erythrocytes.
Author Everson, R. B. ; Wehr, C. M. ; Erexson, G. L. ; MacGregor., J. T. ;
CORP Author Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC. ;National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC. Epidemiology Branch. ;Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA. Western Regional Research Center ;Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC.;Public Health Service, Rockville, MD.
Publisher c1988
Year Published 1988
Report Number EPA/600/J-88/553; PHS-ES-25018;
Stock Number PB91-117614
Additional Subjects Chromosomes ; Erythrocytes ; Folic acid ; Human ; Reprints ; Micronucleus test ; Deficiency diseases ; Cytogenetics ; Splenectomy
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB91-117614 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 03/04/1991
Collation 7p
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated that in the absence of spleen function, frequencies of micronuclei (Howell-Jolly bodies) in peripheral rbcs can be used to measure in vivo cytogenetic damage. Among 20 subjects studied 6 months after splenectomy, 1 had a frequency of micronucleated rbcs more than an order of magnitude higher than rates for the others. Initial data suggested that this subject was mildly folate-depleted, and a therapeutic trial with folate rapidly reduced the frequency of micronucleated rbcs to normal values. These observations suggest a need to evaluate further the contribution of mild levels of folate depletion to spontaneous chromosomal damage. The approach used here provides a sensitive index of clastogenic damage and offers unique opportunities for investigating the determinants of cytogenetic damage in humans.