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RECORD NUMBER: 2 OF 3

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Quantification of Changes in Lakewater Chemistry in Response to Acidic Deposition.
Author Sullivan, T. J. ; Charles, D. F. ; Smol, J. P. ; Cumming, B. F. ; Selle., A. R. ;
CORP Author Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR. ;E and S Environmental Chemistry, Inc., Corvallis, OR. ;Indiana Univ. at Bloomington. Dept. of Biology. ;Queen's Univ., Kingston (Ontario). Dept. of Biology. ;NSI Technology Services Corp., Corvallis, OR. Environmental Research Lab.
Publisher c1990
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA/600/J-90/540;
Stock Number PB91-240481
Additional Subjects Lakes ; Water pollution ; Paleolimnology ; Acidification ; Water chemistry ; Deposition ; Acidic water ; Air pollution ; Air water interactions ; Acid neutralizing capacity ; Spatial distribution ; New York ; Adirondack Mountains ; Watersheds ; pH ; Surface waters ; Reprints ;
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB91-240481 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 11/26/1991
Collation 6p
Abstract
Lakewater acidification in New York's Adirondack Mountains was quantified based on paleolimnological reconstructions of pre-1850 chemistry for 49 lakes. Paleolimnology provides a more accurate assessment of regional acification than was previously possible using water chemistry and model calculations alone. Historical depletion of lakewater acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and increase in labile monomeric Al have been restricted to lakes that are currently low in ANC. Most currently acidic lakes have acidified recently and were not acidic prior to 1850. The percentage of lakes affected and magnitude of the inferred acidification are substantially smaller than generally believed. The results agree, however, with short-term recovery rates previously documented and with spatial patterns in lakewater chemistry across a depositional gradient, and illustrate the importance of watershed and/or in-lake processes in neutralizing acidic atmospheric inputs.