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RECORD NUMBER: 3 OF 5

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Research and Development Efforts to Develop Improved Inventory Methodologies for Area Source Solvent Emissions.
Author Battye, W. ; Viconovic, G. ; Chappell, P. J. ;
CORP Author Pechan (E.H.) and Associates, Inc., Durham, NC. ;EC/R, Inc., Chapel Hill, NC.;Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Publisher 1991
Year Published 1991
Report Number EPA-68-D9-0168; EPA/600/D-91/277;
Stock Number PB92-126846
Additional Subjects Organic solvents ; Air pollution sampling ; Research and development ; Pollution sources ; Data processing ; Concentration(Composition) ; State government ; Local government ; Pollution regulations ; Material balance ; Consumer products ; Industrial wastes ; Evaporation ; Volatile organic compounds ; Emission inventories ; Area sources
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB92-126846 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 02/24/1992
Collation 14p
Abstract
The paper discusses a long range program to improve EPA's inventory methodologies for area source emissions of organic solvents. The most important input to the area source solvent inventory is national solvent usage. Therefore, a major focus of the research to date has been the analysis of potential new sources of information on solvent usage. Data sources have been identified which would improve on the estimation of national solvent use and on the distribution of solvent use to geographical regions and to various time periods. Improved methodologies for distributing national solvent emissions to the state and county level were also investigated. Three potential enhancements to the inventory methology have been identified: (1) improvement of the solvent material balance, (2) incorporation of state and local regulations into the distribution of solvents to states and counties, and (3) incorporation of consumer preference into the geographic distribution of solvent use.