Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 9 OF 11

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Toxicities of Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc to Four Juvenile Stages of Chinook Salmon and Steelhead.
Author Chapman, Gary A. ;
CORP Author National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst., Bethesda, MD.
Year Published 1978
Report Number EPA-600/J-78-170;
Stock Number PB80-223605
Additional Subjects Toxicology ; Cadmium ; Copper ; Zinc ; Salmon ; Trout ; Lethal dosage ; Concentration(Composition) ; Tolerances(Physiology) ; Fishes ; Water pollution ; Reprints ; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha ; Heavy metals ; Toxic substances ; Steelhead trout ; Salmo gairdnerii ; Water pollution effects(Animals)
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB80-223605 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation 9p
Abstract
Continuous-flow toxicity tests were conducted to determine the relative tolerances of newly hatched alevins, swim-up alevins, parr, and smolts of chinook salmon (Oncorhyncus tshawytscha) to cadmium, copper, and zinc. Newly hatched alevins were much more tolerant to cadmium and, to a lesser extent, to zinc than were later juvenile forms. However, the later progression from swim-up alevin, through parr, to smolt was accompanied by a slight increase in metal tolerance. The 96-h LC50 values for all four life stages ranges from 1.0 to >27 micrograms Cd/liter, 17 to 38 micrograms Cu/liter, and 93 to 815 micrograms Zn/liter. Steelhead were consistently more sensitive to these metals than were chinook salmon. When a sensitive life stage for acute toxicity tests with metals is sought, the more resistant newly hatched alevins should be avoided. Although tolerance may increase with age, all later juvenile life stages are more sensitive and should give similar results.