Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 2 OF 2

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Prototype Gas Analysis System Using a Miniature Gas Chromatograph.
Author Angell, James B. ; Jerman, John H. ; Terry, Stephen C. ; Saadat, Soheil ;
CORP Author Stanford Univ., CA. Integrated Circuits Lab.;National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH.;Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Environmental Processes and Effects Research.
Year Published 1981
Report Number PHS-NIOSH-210-77-0159; DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-81-115 ; EPA-700/7-80-184
Stock Number PB83-105122
Additional Subjects Environmental surveys ; Industrial medicine ; Gas chromatography ; Gas analysis ; Exposure ; Toxicity ; Inspection ; Hazardous materials ; Chemical analysis ; Monitors ; Laboratory equipment ; Design ; Performance evaluation ; Air pollution ; Toxic substances ; Occupational safety and health ; Computer aided analysis ; Indoor air pollution
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=20006W7O.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB83-105122 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation 78p
Abstract
A prototype miniature gas chromatograph, capable of real time analysis of atmospheric gas samples, was developed. Integrated circuit processing techniques were used to miniaturize the components of a gas chromatograph system to a size compatible with a portable package. All components of the chromatograph were made by micromachining technique. A sophisticated microcomputer system controls all aspects of the operation. The system automatically samples the air and measures the concentrations of up to 10 contaminant vapors, calculates and stores the contaminant concentrations, and estimates the average worker exposure factor. The instrument can be used as a survey instrument when rapid analysis is required and as an exposure monitor to perform automatic analysis at approximately 1.5 minute intervals. The authors conclude that this instrument should enhance the ability to monitor worker exposures to toxic gases.