Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 36 OF 65

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Midwest Interstate Sulfur Transformation and Transport Project : aerial measurements of urban and power plant plumes, Summer 1974 /
Author White, W. H. ; Anderson, J. A. ; Knuth, W. R. ; Blumenthal, D. L. ; Husar., R. B.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Wilson, William E.
CORP Author Meteorology Research, Inc., Altadena, Calif. ;Washington Univ., St. Louis, Mo.;Environmental Sciences Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, N.C.
Publisher Environmental Sciences Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
Year Published 1976
Report Number EPA-600/3-76-110; 68-02-1919; EPA-68-02-1919
Stock Number PB-262 202
OCLC Number 34647380
Subjects Air--Pollution--Missouri--Measurement. ; Aerial surveys--Missouri. ; Air--Pollution--Meteorological aspects--Missouri.
Additional Subjects Sulfur dioxide ; Sulfates ; Plumes ; Atmospheric chemistry ; Ozone ; Aerosols ; Combustion products ; Industrial wastes ; Electrical power plants ; Sensors ; Sampling ; Monitors ; Urban area ; Chemical reactions ; Oxidants ; Concentration(Composition) ; Regression analysis ; Numerical analysis ; Aerial surveys ; Mathematical models ; Air pollution sampling ; Saint Louis(Missouri) ; Coal-fire power plants ; MISTT project
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9101A7V3.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJAD  EPA 600/3-76-110 Region 3 Library/Philadelphia, PA 06/16/2000
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 600-3-76-110 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 01/15/2014
EJBD  EPA 600-3-76-110 c.1 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 02/24/2014
EKAM  EPA-600/3-76-110 Region 4 Library/Atlanta,GA 05/10/1997
EKBD  EPA-600/3-76-110 Research Triangle Park Library/RTP, NC 05/10/1996
ESAD  EPA 600-3-76-110 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 03/23/2010
NTIS  PB-262 202 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation x, 125 p. : ill., maps ; 27 cm.
Abstract
A portion of the research activities of the Midwest Interstate Sulfur Transformation and Transport Project (Project MISTT) during the summer of 1974 is documented. Using a light plane equipped with instruments for measuring air pollutants and meteorological parameters, investigators mapped the three-dimensional distribution of aerosols and pollutant gases originating in the St. Louis area. Each day's flight plan was designed to characterize a large pollutant plume at discrete distances downwind from its source. The plume from the coal-fired power plant at Labadie, Missouri was followed out to 45 km. Secondary aerosol production within the plume was documented. The estimated average conversion rate for sulfur dioxide to sulfate was about three percent/hour at the distances sampled. The overall removal rate of SO2 was too small to detect, and no net production of ozone was observed. Large pollutant plumes were also identified downwind of central St. Louis and the Wood River refineries. These urban-industrial plumes were followed out to 60-70 km, where they were characterized by elevated concentrations of ozone and light-scattering aerosols.
Notes
EPA Project Officer: William E. Wilson, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Division, Environmental Sciences Research Laboratory. Prepared by Meteorology Research, Inc. and Washington University, Saint Louis, Mo. under Contract No. 68-02-1919 to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. "Ecological Research Series"--Cover. "November 1976." Includes bibliographical references.
Contents Notes
A portion of the research activities of the Midwest Interstate Sulfur Transformation and Transport Project (Project MISTT) during the summer of 1974 is documented. Using a light plane equipped with instruments for measuring air pollutants and meteorological parameters, investigators mapped the three-dimensional distribution of aerosols and pollutant gases originating in the St. Louis area. Each day's flight plan was designed to characterize a large pollutant plume at discrete distances downwind from its source. The plume from the coal-fired power plant at Labadie, Missouri was followed out to 45 km. Secondary aerosol production within the plume was documented. The estimated average conversion rate for sulfur dioxide to sulfate was about three percent/hour at the distances sampled. The overall removal rate of SOb2s was too small to detect, and no net production of ozone was observed. Large pollutant plumes were also identified downwind of central St. Louis and the Wood River refineries. These urban-industrial plumes were followed out to 60-70 km, where they were characterized by elevated concentrations of ozone and light-scattering aerosols.