Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 3 OF 9

Main Title Landscapes of power : politics of energy in the Navajo nation /
Author Powell, Dana E.,
Publisher Duke University Press,
Year Published 2018
OCLC Number 1003489312
ISBN 9780822369882; 0822369885; 9780822369943; 082236994X; 9780822372295; 0822372290
Subjects Political ecology--Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah ; Energy development--Political aspects--Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah ; Coal-fired power plants--Environmental aspects--Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah ; Coal-fired power plants--Economic aspects--Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah ; Power resources--Environmental aspects--Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah ; Power resources--Economic aspects--Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah ; Politische Anthropologie ; Politische èOkologie ; Ressourcenmanagement ; Entwicklungspolitik ; Interessenkonflikt ; Kohlekraftwerk ; Umweltschutz ; Nachhaltigkeit ; Aktivismus ; Energieversorgung ; Indigenismus
Additional Subjects Umschulungswerkstätten fèur Siedler und Auswanderer--Bitterfeld
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ELBM  JA75.8.P76 2018 AWBERC Library/Cincinnati,OH 07/13/2022
Collation xxii, 309 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents Notes
In Landscapes of Power Dana E. Powell examines the rise and fall of the controversial Desert Rock Power Plant initiative in New Mexico to trace the political conflicts surrounding Native sovereignty and contemporary energy development on Navajo (Dine) Nation land. Powell's historical and ethnographic account shows how the coal-fired power plant project's defeat provided the basis for redefining the legacies of colonialism, mineral extraction, and environmentalism. Examining the labor of activists, artists, politicians, elders, technicians, and others, Powell emphasizes the generative potential of Navajo resistance to articulate a vision of autonomy in the face of twenty-first-century colonial conditions. Ultimately, Powell situates local Navajo struggles over energy technology and infrastructure within broader sociocultural life, debates over global climate change, and tribal, federal, and global politics of extraction. -- From back cover.