Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 18 OF 19

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Treatability Study Report of Green Mountain Laboratories, Inc.'s Bioremediation Process. Treatment of PCB Contaminated Soils, at Beede Waste Oil/Cash Energy Superfund Site, Plaistow, New Hampshire.
CORP Author Science Applications International Corp., Cincinnati, OH.;National Risk Management Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH. Office of Research and Development.
Publisher Apr 2005
Year Published 2005
Report Number EPA-68-C5-0036; EPA/540/R-05/006;
Stock Number PB2005-109277
Additional Subjects Land pollution control ; Bioremediation ; Polychlorinated biphenyls ; Soil treatment ; Evaluation ; Effectivenss ; Treatment processes ; Contamination ; Innoculation ; Augmentation ; Nutrients ; Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) ; Green Mountain Laboratories Inc ; Beede Waste Oil/Cash Energy ; Bulk microbial inoculum ; Plaistow(New Hampshire)
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=2000E5XQ.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2005-109277 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 07/12/2006
Collation 48p
Abstract
In 1998, under the sponsorship of the New Hampshire - Department of Environmental Services (NHDES), Green Mountain Laboratories, Inc. (GML) and the USEPA agreed to carry out a Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) project to evaluate the effectiveness of GMLs Bioremediation Process for the treatment of PCB contaminated soils at the Beede Waste Oil/Cash Energy Superfund site in Plaistow, New Hampshire (hereinafter referred to as the Beede site). The treatment process involved inoculation/augmenting of the PCB bulk microbial inoculum and nutrients, and allowing the microbes to aerobically degrade the PCBs. The bulk inoculum was produced on-site by the developer using animal feed-grade oatmeal as the substrate, shredded pine needles that provided certain specific co-metabolite compounds, nutrients and a proprietary consortium of microorganisms capable of degrading the PCBs to their eventual endpoints - carbon dioxide and mineral halides.