Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 171 OF 198

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Relationships of Natural Enemies and Non-Prey Foods [electronic resource] /
Type EBOOK
Author Lundgren, Jonathan G.
Publisher Springer Netherlands,
Year Published 2009
Call Number QL360-599.82
ISBN 9781402092350
Subjects Life sciences. ; Botany. ; Plant diseases. ; Zoology. ; Invertebrates.
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-9235-0
Collation XXXVI, 454 p. online resource.
Notes
Due to license restrictions, this resource is available to EPA employees and authorized contractors only
Contents Notes
Glucophagy -- The Functions of Non-Prey Foods in the Diets of Entomophagous Species -- The Sugar Feeders -- Floral Nectar -- Extrafloral Nectar -- Honeydew -- Pollinivory -- The Pollen Feeders -- Adaptations to Pollen feeding -- Pollen Nutrition and Defense -- Granivory -- The Seed Feeders -- Adaptations to Granivory -- Seed Nutrition and Defense -- Seed-Associated Food Bodies -- Seed Preferences of Natural Enemies -- Fungi and Microorganisms -- Mycophagy -- Symbioses with Microorganisms -- Applied Aspects of Non-Prey Foods for Natural Enemies -- Non-Prey Foods and Biological Control of Arthropods -- Plant-Incorporated Pest Resistance and Natural Enemies -- Biological Control of Weed Seeds in Agriculture Using Omnivorous Insects -- Conclusions and the Relative Quality of Non-Prey Foods for Natural Enemies. There are very few natural enemies so maladapted as to rely on prey as their sole nutritional resource. The importance of non-prey sources of nutrition have received disproportionately less attention than prey when one considers how important non-prey foods are to the evolution and ecology of natural enemies. This book examines the intricate and diverse interactions between non-prey foods and natural enemies from both parties' perspectives, beginning at an organismal level and taking the reader on a journey that illustrates how these interactions are inextricably tied to the outcome of biological control programs targeting insects and weed seeds.