Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 5 OF 5

Main Title Spatially realistic population model for informing forest management decisions
Author Wilhere, G. F. ; Schumaker, N. H. ; Horton, S. P. ;
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR. ;Washington State Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia.
Publisher Washington State Department of Natural Resources,
Year Published 1999
Report Number PB2001-100512 ; EPA 600-A-00-073
Stock Number PB2001-100512
OCLC Number 47789742
Subjects Spotted owl--Northwest, Pacific ; Animal populations ; Forest management--Mathematical models ; Wildlife management
Additional Subjects Forest management ; Animal populations ; Mathematical models ; Monitoring ; Terrestrial ecosystems ; Birds ; Animal habitats ; Wildlife management ; Owls ; Surveys ; Spatial Realistic Population Model(SRPM)
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=P100SSB4.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ESAD  EPA 600-A-00-073 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 08/24/2001
NTIS  PB2001-100512 Some EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. 07/26/2022
Collation 21 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Abstract
A spatially realistic population model (SRPM) was developed to evaluate the relative effects of different habitat management strategies on the spotted owl subpopulation of the Olympic Peninsula. SPRMs address a fundamental problem commonly confronted by wildlife managers- predicting the effects of landscape-scale habitat management on animal population. The most frustrating problem with SRPM is the lack of data needed to relate movement and demographic parameters to habitat quality. SPRMs typically consist of three submodels: (1) a habitat submodel, (2) a movement submodel, and (3) a demographic submodel. Habitat submodel must interface with the demographic and movement submodels. That is, the submodel should delineate landscape units that have demographic significance, such as territories, or that may be relevant to movement behavior, such as habitat corridors. In this case study a new approach called 'parameter tuning ' was developed to generate parameter values.
Notes
Prepared in cooperation with Washington State Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia. Includes bibliographic references.
Contents Notes
A spatially realistic population model (SRPM) was developed to evaluate the relative effects of different habitat management strategies on the spotted owl subpopulation of the Olympic Peninsula. SPRMs address a fundamental problem commonly confronted by wildlife managers- predicting the effects of landscape-scale habitat management on animal population. The most frustrating problem with SRPM is the lack of data needed to relate movement and demographic parameters to habitat quality. SPRMs typically consist of three submodels: (1) a habitat submodel, (2) a movement submodel, and (3) a demographic submodel. Habitat submodel must interface with the demographic and movement submodels. That is, the submodel should delineate landscape units that have demographic significance, such as territories, or that may be relevant to movement behavior, such as habitat corridors. In this case study a new approach called 'parameter tuning ' was developed to generate parameter values.