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OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Interaction of Aqueous Solutions of Chlorine with Malic Acid, Tartaric Acid, and Various Fruit Juices. A Source of Mutagens.
Author Chang, T. L. ; Streicher, R. P. ; Zimmer., H. ;
CORP Author Cincinnati Univ., OH. Dept. of Chemistry.;Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Publisher c1988
Year Published 1988
Report Number EPA-R-812579; EPA/600/J-88/549;
Stock Number PB91-116046
Additional Subjects Chlorination ; Malic acid ; Tartaric acid ; Citric acid ; Solutions ; Mutagens ; pH ; Mass spectrocopy ; Gas chromatography ; Chlorine organic compounds ; Stereochemistry ; Reprints ; Fruit juices ; Dichloroacetonitrile
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB91-116046 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 03/04/1991
Collation 22p
Abstract
The interactions of aqueous solutions of chlorine with some fruit acids (citric acid, DL-malic acid, and L-tartaric acid) at different pH values were studied. Diethyl ether extraction followed by GC/MS analysis indicated that a number of mutagens (certain chlorinated propanones and chloral hydrate) are present as major products in some of these samples. A number of fruit juices (orange, grape, apple, pineapple, and grapefruit) were also treated with aqueous solutions of chlorine at their pH values. The products were analyzed by GC/MS. The same mutagens that were formed by the pure acids (citric acid and DL-malic acid) were identified as major products in ether extracts of these samples. Another mutagen, dichloroacetonitrile, was also identified as a minor product in some of these juice samples. All of the major products observed in the chlorination of all five fruit juices are potentially derived from reactions of aqueous solutions of chlorine with citric or malic acid and with trace amounts of acetaldehyde and acetone in the juices. The minor product, dichloroacetonitrile, is likely derived from the chlorination of certain amino acids in the fruit juices. (Copyright (c) 1988 by Marcel Dekker, Inc.)