Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 38 OF 60

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Our built and natural environments : a technical review of the interactions between land use, transportation, and environmental quality.
CORP Author ICF Consulting, Fairfax, VA.;Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Development, Community, and Environmental Division.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Development, Community, and Environment Division,
Year Published 2001
Report Number EPA 231-R-01-002; EPA-68-W-99-054
Stock Number PB2002-107125
OCLC Number 48576529
Subjects Transportation--Environmental aspects--United States. ; Transportation, Automotive--Environmental aspects--United States. ; Land use--United States--Planning. ; Environmental quality. ; Environmental policy--United States. ; Environmental protection--United States. ; Land use--Planning.
Additional Subjects Land use ; Transportation ; Environmental quality ; Trends ; Urban areas ; Public transit ; Interactions ; Environmental impacts ; Development ; Motor vehicles ; Reviews ;
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=40000OAX.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EHAD  EPA/231/R-01-002 Region 1 Library/Boston,MA 01/11/2002
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 231-R-01-002 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 04/29/2011
EJBD  EPA 231-R-01-002 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 06/18/2013
EJED  EPA 231/R-01/002 OCSPP Chemical Library/Washington,DC 12/10/2004
EKBD  EPA 231-R-01-002 Research Triangle Park Library/RTP, NC 07/19/2002
ELAD  EPA 231-R-01-002 Region 5 Library/Chicago,IL 11/02/2009
ERAD  EPA 231/R-01-002 Region 9 Library/San Francisco,CA 04/27/2007
ESAD  EPA 231-R-01-002 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 01/17/2003
NTIS  PB2002-107125 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 10/23/2002
Collation v, 93 pages : illustrations, maps, charts ; 28 cm
Abstract
In recent years interest has grown in Smart Growth as a mechanism for improving environmental quality. In this report, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) summarizes technical research on the relationship between the built and natural environments, as well as current understanding of the role of development patterns, urban design, and transportation in improving environmental quality. Our Built and Natural Environments is designed as a technical reference for analysts in state and local governments, academics, and people studying the implications of development on the natural environment. The built environment has direct and indirect effects on the natural environment. Urban form directly affects habitat, ecosystems, endangered species, and water quality through land consumption, habitat fragmentation, and replacement of natural cover with impervious surfaces. Development patterns and practices also indirectly affect environmental quality since urban form influences the travel decisions that people make. Certain patterns of development encourage increased use of motor vehicles, which is associated with growth in emissions of air pollutants and the greenhouse gases that contribute to global climate change. Air pollution and climate change, in turn, can adversely affect water quality and habitat. The report first examines trends in land use and their impacts. It then explores how various development patterns and practices can minimize environmental damage.
Notes
Cover title. "January 2001"--Cover. "EPA 231-R-01-002"--Cover. "Final document produced under EPA contract 68-W-99-054 for the Development Community, and Environment Division, US EPA Office of Policy, Economics, and Innovation, by ICF Consulting"--Acknowledgements. Includes bibliographical references (pages 83-93).
Contents Notes
In recent years interest has grown in Smart Growth as a mechanism for improving environmental quality. In Our Built and Natural Environments, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) summarizes technical research on the relationship between the built and natural environments, as well as current understanding of the role of development patterns, urban design, and transportation in improving environmental quality.