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RECORD NUMBER: 14 OF 40

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Exemplar of liberty : native America and the evolution of democracy /
Author Grinde, Donald A.,
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Johansen, Bruce E.
Publisher American Indian Studies Center, University of California, Los Angeles,
Year Published 1991
OCLC Number 25438955
ISBN 0935626352; 9780935626353
Subjects Indians of North America--Politics and government. ; Indians of North America--Public opinion. ; Public opinion--Europe. ; United States--Politics and government--To 1775. ; United States--Politics and government--1775-1783. ; Demokratie ; Indianer ; USA ; Indiens--âEtats-Unis--Opinion publique--Histoire. ; Indiens--Relations avec l'âEtat--âEtats-Unis. ; Europe--Opinion publique--Histoire. ; âEtats-Unis--Politique et gouvernement--1600-1775 (Période coloniale) ; âEtats-Unis--Politique et gouvernement--1775-1783.
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
EHAM NAR NAR-10 Region 1 Library/Boston,MA 03/21/2020
Collation xxv, 320 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 251-310) and index.
Contents Notes
Vox Americana -- Perceptions of America's native democracies -- Natural man in an unnatural land -- Ennobling "savages" -- Errand in the wilderness -- The white roots reach out -- Mohawks, axes, and taxes -- A new chapter -- An American synthesis -- Kindling a new grand council fire -- The persistence of an idea. "We attempt to trace both ideas and the events that dramatized them: life, liberty, and happiness (Declaration of Independence); government by reason and consent rather than coercion (Albany Plan and Articles of Confederation); religious toleration (and ultimately religious acceptance) instead of a state church; checks and balances; federalism (United States Constitution); and relative equality of property, equal rights before the law, and the thorny problem of creating a government that can rule equitably across a broad geographic expanse (Bill of Rights of the United States Constitution). Native America had a substantial role in shaping these ideas, as well as the events that turned the colonies into a nation of states.