Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 34 OF 217

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Crime Modeling and Mapping Using Geospatial Technologies [electronic resource] /
Type EBOOK
Author Leitner, Michael.
Publisher Springer Netherlands : Imprint: Springer,
Year Published 2013
Call Number GA1-1776
ISBN 9789400749979
Subjects Geography. ; Geographical information systems. ; Statistics. ; Criminology.
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-4997-9
Collation XIII, 446 p. 152 illus., 110 illus. in color. online resource.
Notes
Due to license restrictions, this resource is available to EPA employees and authorized contractors only
Contents Notes
From the Contents: Spatial Heterogeneity in Crime Analysis -- When Does a Drug Market Become a Drug Market? Finding the Boundaries of Illicit Event Concentrations -- Convicted Sex Offender Residential Movements -- Street-Level Spatiotemporal Crime Analysis: Examples from Bronx County, NY (2006-2010) -- Exploring Spatial Patterns of Crime Using Non-Hierarchical Cluster Analysis -- Reconstitution of the Journeys to Crime and Location of their Origin in the Context of a Crime Series. A Raster Solution for a Real Case Study -- Journey-to-Crime by Gender and Age Group in Manchester, England -- Crime Scene Locations in Criminal Homicides: A Spatial Crime Analysis in a GIS Environment. Recent years in North America have seen a rapid development in the area of crime analysis and mapping using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology. In 1996, the US National Institute of Justice (NIJ) established the crime mapping research center (CMRC), to promote research, evaluation, development, and dissemination of GIS technology. The long-term goal is to develop a fully functional Crime Analysis System (CAS) with standardized data collection and reporting mechanisms, tools for spatial and temporal analysis, visualization of data and much more. Among the drawbacks of current crime analysis systems is their lack of tools for spatial analysis. For this reason, spatial analysts should research which current analysis techniques (or variations of such techniques) that have been already successfully applied to other areas (e.g., epidemiology, location-allocation analysis, etc.) can also be employed to the spatial analysis of crime data. This book presents a few of those cases.