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RECORD NUMBER: 35 OF 113

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Economic analysis related to disposal of contaminated sediments on state-owned aquatic lands : Draft /
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Leschine, Thomas M.
Green, Thomas H.
Publisher Battelle,
Year Published 1997
OCLC Number 1109969284
Subjects Dredging spoil--Environmental aspects. ; Soil remediation. ; Cost effectiveness--Economics.
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ESAD  10A007541 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 07/30/2019
Collation 1 volume, various pagings : illustrated
Notes
Includes bibliographical references.
Contents Notes
"In 1991, the Washington Department of Ecology estimated that up to 35 million cubic yards of sediment will be dredged for navigation in the Puget Sound in the coming 20 years, of which 10 million cubic yards will be contaminated ... A number of state and federal agencies, including the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR), are sponsoring the Puget Sound Confined Disposal Site Study to systematically consider sites where contaminated sediments could be disposed of in an environmentally sound manner. Two common disposal methods -- deepwater confined aquatic disposal (CAD) and nearshore confined disposal facilities (CDF) -- make use of aquatic lands. As a steward of state-owned aquatic lands in Washington state, the DNR has a special interest in the disposal of contaminated sediments. With the Puget Sound Confined Disposal Site Study scheduled for completion in 1999, DNR forsees imminent decisions concerning disposal sites very possibly impacting aquatic land it manages. DNR seeks information and analytical methods useful in its decision-making about whether it should permit CDFs and CADs on state-owned aquatic land. This report establishes an analytical framework for assessing the benefits and costs of in-water options for the disposal and management of contaminated sediment, where the contaminated sediment is derived from the maintenance and remediation dredging of ports and navigational channels in Puget Sound."--Ix. Introduction