Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 162 OF 186

Main Title The kinetics of chemical and microbiological contaminants in distribution systems /
Author Goodrich, J. A.
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.
Publisher US Environmental Protection Agency, Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory,
Year Published 1991
Report Number EPA/600/D-91/024
Stock Number PB91-176776
Additional Subjects Water quality ; Potable water ; Distribution systems ; Chemical compounds ; Aquatic microbiology ; Kinetics ; Water treatment ; Water chemistry ; Physical properties ; Odors ; Taste ; Pollution regulations ; Asbestos ; Disinfection ; Byproducts ; Heavy metals ; Standards compliance ; Aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons ; Halomethanes ; Reprints
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Status
NTIS  PB91-176776 Some EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. 07/26/2022
Collation 19 pages : diagrams ; 29 cm
Abstract
Once treated drinking water enters the distribution system, substantial microbial, chemical, and physical changes can occur. Examples of such changes can include loss of disinfectant residual, increases in disinfection byproducts (DBP), growth of microbial diversity and population or an increase in heavy metal concentration. These water quality changes often result in aesthetic problems such as turbid water, red and/or black water or tastes and odors. Such conditions do not necessarily pose a threat to human health. However, several water quality changes in distribution systems could violate Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) proposed by the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments and pose a threat to human health. Asbestos fibers can be released into drinking water from deteriorated asbestos-cement water mains (1). Treated waters may also have mutagenic potential from increases in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons because of the leaching of asphalt-lined pipes (2). Lead, trihalomethanes (THMs), other DBPs, or coliforms may exceed the regulations at the tap although the water leaving the treatment plant was in compliance.
Notes
Microfiche.