Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 11 OF 12

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title The environment and the people in American cities, 1600-1900s : disorder, inequality, and social change /
Author Taylor, Dorceta E.
Publisher Duke University Press,
Year Published 2009
OCLC Number 430344415
ISBN 9780822344360; 082234436X; 9780822344513; 0822344513
Subjects Cities and towns--United States--Growth--History. ; Cities and towns--Growth--Environmental aspects--United States. ; Cities and towns--Growth--Social aspects--United States. ; City planning--United States. ; Urbanität. ; Stadtentwicklung. ; Stadtplanung. ; Stadtsoziologie. ; USA. ; Urbanitèat
Internet Access
Description Access URL
Book review (H-Net) http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=30148
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ESAM  HT371.T39 2009 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 07/31/2018
Collation xii, 626 pages ; 24 cm
Notes
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents Notes
The evolution of American cities -- Epidemics, cities, and environmental reform -- Wealthy urbanites : fleeing downtown and privatizing green space -- Social inequality and the quest for order in the city -- Data gathering as a mechanism for understanding the city and imposing order -- Sanitation and housing reform -- Conceptualizing and framing urban parks -- Elite ideology, activism, and park development -- Social class, activism, and park use -- Contemporary efforts to finance urban parks -- Class, race, space, and zoning in America -- Land use and zoning in American cities -- Workplace and community hazards -- The industrial workplace. In The Environment and the People in American Cities, Dorceta E. Taylor provides an in-depth examination of the development of urban environments, and urban environmentalism, in the United States. Taylor focuses on the evolution of the city, the emergence of elite reformers, the framing of environmental problems, and the perceptions of and responses to breakdowns in social order, from the seventeenth century through the twentieth.-publisher description.