Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 12 OF 14

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Practical bomb scene investigation /
Author Thurman, James T.
Publisher CRC/Taylor & Francis,
Year Published 2006
OCLC Number 61758009
ISBN 0849341981; 9780849341984
Subjects Bombing investigation. ; Explosions. ; Forensic sciences.
Internet Access
Description Access URL
CRCnetBASE http://www.crcnetbase.com/isbn/9780849341984
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ELBM  HV8079.B62T487 2006 AWBERC Library/Cincinnati,OH 11/18/2016
Collation xxvi, 465 pages : color illustrations ; 25 cm.
Notes
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents Notes
1. Explosion theory and dynamics -- 1.1. Introduction -- 1.2. The scientific method -- 1.3. Explosives -- 1.4. Types of explosives -- 1.5. Classification and sensitivity of explosives -- 1.6. Firing trains -- 1.8. Additional characteristics of explosives -- 1.9. Accountability of explosives and explosives detection -- 1.10. Explosions -- 1.10.1. Types of explosions -- 1.10.2. Explosive effects -- 1.11. Explosion scene investigation -- Summary -- Review questions -- References and additional reading -- 2. Identification and recognition of commercial and military explosives -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. A short history of explosives -- 2.3. Low explosives -- 2.3.1. Black powder -- 2.3.2. Pyrodex -- 2.3.3. Photoflash powder -- 2.3.4. Smokeless powder -- 2.4. Commercial explosives -- 2.4.1. Primary explosives -- 2.4.1.1. Lead azide -- 2.4.1.2. Lead styphnate -- 2.4.1.3. Mercury fulminate -- 2.4.1.4. Diazodinitrophenol (DDNP) -- 2.4.1.5. Tetrazene -- 2.4.2. Secondary explosives -- 2.4.2.1. Ammonium nitrate -- 2.4.2.2. Nitroglycerin (NG) -- 2.4.2.3. Trinitrotoluene (TNT) -- 2.4.2.4. Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) -- 2.4.2.5. Cyclo-trimethylene trinitramine RDX -- 2.4.2.6. Dynamite -- 2.4.2.7. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO) -- 2.5. Water based products -- 2.5.1. Water gel or slurry explosives -- 2.5.2. Emulsion explosives -- 2.6. Boosters -- 2.7. Binary explosives -- 2.8. Sheet explosives -- 2.9. Foreign explosives -- 2.10. U.S. military explosives -- 2.10.1. TNT charges -- 2.10.2. Composition 4 (C-4) -- 2.10.3. Sheet explosives -- 2.10.4. Military dynamite -- 2.11. Improvised explosives -- 2.12. Initiating systems and components -- 2.12.1. Initiators -- 2.12.1.1. Safety and hobby fuse -- 2.12.1.2. Fuse lighter -- 2.12.1.3. Detonating cord -- 2.12.1.4. Shock tube -- 2.12.1.5. Detonator -- 2.12.6. Fuse caps -- 2.12.1.7. Shock tube detonators -- 2.12.1.8. Electric detonators -- 2.12.1.9. Electronic detonators -- 2.12.1.10. Exploding bridgewire detonators (EBWs) -- 2.12.1.11. Squibs -- 2.12.1.12. Electric matches -- 2.13. Chapter summary -- Chapter review questions -- References and additional reading. 3. Improvised explosive device components--pre- and post-blast identification -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) -- 3.2.1. Factors effecting IED construction -- 3.2.2. Basic components of the IED -- 3.2.3. Primary effect by type of IED -- 3.2.4. Appearance of an IED -- 3.2.5. Components of the IED -- 3.2.5.1. Initiators -- 3.2.5.2. Containers -- 3.2.5.3. Electrical components -- 3.2.5.4. Timing mechanisms -- 3.2.5.5. Fragmentation-shrapnel -- 3.2.5.6. Adhesives -- 3.2.5.7. Tape -- 3.2.5.8. Wood -- 3.2.5.9. Paper -- 3.2.5.10. Fasteners -- 3.2.5.11. Nonelectric wire -- 3.3. Fuzing systems -- 3.4. The investigative process -- 3.5. Chapter summary -- Chapter review questions -- References -- 4. The investigation of the bombing scene and collection of evidence -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. Investigative outline -- 4.2.1. Initial response -- 4.2.2. Evaluation of the explosion scene -- 4.2.2.1. Evaluation and establishment of scene perimeters, inner and outer, and scene security -- 4.2.2.2. Establishment of a command post location for the crime scene investigation team -- 4.2.2.3. Establishment of documentation procedures to account for personnel entering and exiting the scene -- 4.2.2.4. Establishment of entry and exit paths for crime scene investigation team members -- 4.2.2.5. Establishment of staging areas for team members -- 4.2.2.6. Safety (to the extent possible) for entry by the investigation team -- 4.2.2.7. Level of investigative assistance and resources required -- 4.2.2.8. Whether a search warrant or permission to search is required -- 4.2.2.9. What documentation procedures will be utilized for evidence collection, control, and chain of custody -- 4.2.2.10. What procedures will be utilized to prevent scene contamination -- 4.2.2.11. Identify items of possible evidence -- 4.2.2.12. Attempt to locate the epicenter of the explosion -- 4.2.2.13. Personnel, supplies, and equipment resources -- 4.2.3. Entering the scene (scene investigation) -- 4.2.3.1. Entering the scene -- 4.2.4. Documentation of the explosion scene -- 4.2.5. Where to find evidence at the bomb scene -- 4.2.6. How to find evidence at the bomb scene -- 4.2.7. How to collect evidence at the bomb scene -- 4.2.7.1. Special situations for evidence collection -- 4.2.8. Final survey -- 4.2.9. Release of the scene -- 4.2.9.1. Submission of evidence to the laboratory -- 4.2.10. The field (or outside) investigation -- 4.2.10.1. Where to start the field investigation -- 4.3. Chapter summary -- Chapter review questions -- References and additional reading. 5. The bomb scene investigator and weapons of mass destruction -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Types of WMD -- 5.3. Nuclear, biological, and chemical materials -- 5.3.1. Nuclear materials -- 5.3.2. Biological materials -- 5.3.2.1. Biological microorganisms classifications -- 5.3.3. Chemical agents -- 5.4. WMD : hazards -- 5.5. Determining WMD presence -- 5.6. WMD protection methods -- 5.7. Key issues for investigating the WMD scene -- 5.7.1. Determine if a WMD was used -- 5.7.2. Ensure scene control and security -- 5.7.3. Ensure that appropriate protection methods are employed -- 5.7.4. Address immediate life safety hazards -- 5.7.5. Contact appropriate outside agencies for assistance -- 5.7.6. Preserve potential evidence -- 5.8. Chapter summary -- Chapter review questions -- References and additional reading -- 6. An introduction into the identification of military explosive ordnance -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.2. Definitions -- 6.3. Physical characteristics of military ordnance -- 6.4. Identification features of military ordnance -- 6.4.1. Dropped ordnance -- 6.4.2. Projected ordnance -- 6.4.3. Thrown ordnance -- 6.4.4. Placed ordnance -- 6.5. Chapter summary -- Chapter review questions -- References -- 7. Capabilities of the forensic laboratory--reading the bomber's signature -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2. Laboratory capabilities in the examination of IEDs -- 7.2.1. Device reconstruction -- 7.2.2. Explosive residue analysis -- 7.2.3. Latent fingerprint examinations -- 7.2.4. Materials analysis -- 7.2.5. Document examinations -- 7.2.6. Tool mark examinations -- 7.2.7. Metallurgical examinations -- 7.2.8. DNA analysis -- 7.3. Reading the bomber's signature -- 7.3.1. Introduction -- 7.4. Chapter review -- Chapter review questions -- References and additional reading. This book presents methods and procedures used to effectively locate and collect evidence at the site of an explosion. It uses case studies to promote an organized, methodical approach to investigation. It addresses safety issues such as military ordinance identification procedures and indicators of biological, chemical, and radiological material use. It provides full-color photographic documentation of bomb scenes, explosives, military ordnance, and bomb components. The book also uses examples of chain of custody and scene administration forms, diagrams and tables, methods of equipment decontamination, explosives residue collection procedures and spread sheets on characteristics of explosive products.