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RECORD NUMBER: 7 OF 9

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Going against the current : expanding the inland aquatic monitoring culture of federal and state agencies /
Author Olsen, Anthony R. ; Olsen, A. R.
CORP Author National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab., Corvallis, OR. Western Ecology Div.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL Western Ecology Division,
Year Published 1999
Report Number EPA 600-A-99-096
Stock Number PB2000-102944
OCLC Number 728024499
Subjects Water quality management--United States--States. ; Water--Pollution--United States--States. ; Water quality. ; Environmental monitoring.
Additional Subjects Environmental monitoring ; Government programs ; Water quality management ; Surveys ; Federal agencies ; State agencies ; US GS ; US ePA ; Interagency coordination ; Intergovernmental relations ; Sampling ; Lakes ; Streams ; Clean Water Act ; Probability ; Requirements ; Social factors ; Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program ; NAWQA(National Water Quality Assessment) ; National Water Quality Assessment Program
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100RRPU.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
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Checkout
Status
ESAD  EPA 600-A-99-096 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 06/07/2011
NTIS  PB2000-102944 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 06/06/2000
Collation [10] p. ; 28 cm.
Abstract
The author's interest concerns the design of lake and stream monitoring programs implemented by federal and state agencies in response to the Clean Water Act. Past, and most current, monitoring designs select sites using judgement criteria. Such designs provide data for assessing impacts of point source discharges. The Clean Water Act also requires a national assessment of all waters within the United States. The U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. EPA initiated two independent programs: the National Water Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) and the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). These programs use two different scientific approaches for monitoring. In addition, states have competing monitoring requirement. When the academic community's scientific research perspective is added, the result is a natural adversity among the groups. The paper discusses the underlying cultural conflicts associated with monitoring and present mechanisms that have been used to expand the culture, especially with states.
Notes
"EPA 600-A-99-096"--Cover. "PB2000-102944"--Cover. "October, 1999"--Cover. "To be published in 1999 Proceedings Section on Statistics and the Environment"--Cover. Caption title. Includes bibliographical references.
Contents Notes
My interest concerns the design of lake and stream monitoring programs implemented by federal and state agencies in response to the Clean Water Act. Past, and most current, monitoring designs select sites using judgment criteria. Such designs provide valuable data for assessing impacts of point source discharges. The Clean Water Act also requires a national assessment of all waters within the United States. The assessment is accomplished by compiling information obtained from state monitoring programs. Such data do not provide a defensible assessment. An impetus for change began in the late 1980s. The U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. EPA initiated two independent programs: the National Water Quality Assessment program (NAWQA) and the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). These programs use two different scientific approaches for monitoring. In addition, States have competing monitoring requirements. When the academic community's scientific research perspective is added, the result is a natural adversity among the groups. The paper discusses the underlaying cultural conflicts associated with monitoring and present mechanisms that have been used to expand the culture, especially with states.