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RECORD NUMBER: 13 OF 15

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Reproductive Toxicity of a Single Dose of 1,3-Dinitrobenzene in Two Ages of Young Adult Male Rats.
Author Linder, R. E. ; Strader, L. F. ; Barbee, R. R. ; Rehnberg, G. L. ; Perreault, S. D. ;
CORP Author Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Publisher c1990
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA/600/J-90/018;
Stock Number PB90-217415
Additional Subjects Toxicity ; Reproduction(Biology) ; Rats ; Males ; Testis ; Histology ; Reprints ; Dinitrobenzenes ; Epididymis ; Organ weight ; Spermatozoa ; Dose-response relationships
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB90-217415 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 08/27/1990
Collation 17p
Abstract
The studies evaluated the reproductive response and the possible influence of testicular maturation on the reproductive parameters, in male rats treated with 1,3-Dinitrobenzene (M-DNB). Young adult male rats (75 or 105 days of age) were given a single oral dose of 0, 8, 16, 24, 32, or 48 mg/kg of m-DNB and killed at 14 days post-treatment. Mortality and neurotoxicity were observed at 48 mg/kg but only in the older animals. Epididymis weight, testicular sperm head counts, cauda sperm reserves, and sperm morphology were affected at 16 and 24 mg/kg and higher in the older and younger animals, respectively. Testis weight and sperm motility were affected at 24 mg/kg and higher in both age groups. Histologic changes included maturation depletion of mid and late spermatids at 16 mg/kg and higher, atrophy of a few to many seminiferous tubules at 24 mg/kg and higher, and immature germ cells in the epidymis. The movement and/or mixing of luminal elements in the epididymis appeared to be influenced by severe testicular effects. In separate groups given only the 48 mg/kg dosage, fertilizing ability was lost by 5-6 weeks post-treatment and several animals failed to recover in 5 months. (Copyright (c) 1990 Society of Toxicology.)