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RECORD NUMBER: 35 OF 37

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Tropospheric Ozone and Fine Particle Air Quality Problems.
Author Jones, L. G. ;
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air Pollution Prevention and Control Div.
Publisher 1998
Year Published 1998
Report Number EPA/600/A-97/112;
Stock Number PB98-135668
Additional Subjects Ozone ; Air pollution control ; Stationary pollutant sources ; Particles ; Particulates ; Emissions ; Troposphere ; Air quality management ; Air pollution standards ; Standards compliance ; Air pollution sources ; Responsibility ; Federal government ; State government ; Rule making ; Clean Air Act ; Volatile organic compounds ; Hazardous air pollutants
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB98-135668 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 08/30/1998
Collation 10p
Abstract
The paper discusses troposphere ozone and fine particle air quality problems. Regulation of air quality in the U.S. is governed by Public law 101-549, enacted by the 101st Congress on November 15, 1990, to amend the Clean Air Act (CAA). The four most generally applicable approaches (i.e., those which may apply to any relevant emission source category) to control volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are settings: (1) Air quality goals to protect public health and welfare for criteria air pollutants, (2) Technology forcing standards for new sources of criteria air pollutants, (3) Technology forcing standards for new and existing sources of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), and (4) Conventional or technology forcing standards for existing sources of criteria air pollutants to meet air quality goals. Approaches 1-3 for air quality control are federal responsibilities. Approach 4 is a state government responsibility carried out with federal guidance and review to attain air quality goals, and is the primary approach used to attain most stationary source VOC emission reductions.