Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 10 OF 15

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Land application of wastewater and state water law : an overview /
Author Large, Donald W.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Harlin, Curtis C.
CORP Author Economic Research Service, Washington, D.C. ;Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Law School.;Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada, Okla.
Publisher Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ; Available to the public through National Technical Information Services [distributor],
Year Published 1977
Report Number EPA-600/2-77-232
Stock Number PB-277 120
OCLC Number 18525958
ISBN pbk.
Subjects Water--Law and legislation--United States--States. ; Water--Law and legislation--U.S. states.
Additional Subjects Irrigation ; Sewage treatment ; Sewage disposal ; Water law ; Waste water ; Surface waters ; Water flow ; Water rights ; Government policies ; State government ; Ground water ; Water distribution ; Allocations ; Land application ; Sewage irrigation
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100PI9N.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 600-2-77-232 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 09/05/2012
EJBD  EPA 600-2-77-232 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 09/11/2014
EKBD  EPA-600/2-77-232 Research Triangle Park Library/RTP, NC 06/27/2003
ELBD  EPA 600-2-77-232 AWBERC Library/Cincinnati,OH 01/30/2004
EMBD  EPA/600/2-77/232 NRMRL/GWERD Library/Ada,OK 02/17/1995
ERAD  EPA 600/2-77-232 Region 9 Library/San Francisco,CA 09/24/2012
ESAD  EPA 600-2-77-232 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 07/31/2017
NTIS  PB-277 120 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 01/01/1988
Collation viii, 60 pages ; 28 cm.
Abstract
This research project was undertaken with the overall objective of analyzing state water rights law in order to determine its possible impact on systems of land application of wastewater. It was determined that most states do not have regulations specifically controlling land application of wastewater, and that an analysis would have to be undertaken of basic state water law principles which, for the most part, have been developed with entirely different uses of water in mind. There is a basic distinction between the 'riparian' states of the East, which emphasize the right of each riparian landowner along a watercourse to the use of the water, and the 'appropriation' states of the West, which emphasize that the right inures to the prior user of the water. For the most part, state water rights law was found to contain enough flexibility, through its emphasis on encouraging 'reasonable' uses of water, to enable land application systems to operate free from legal uncertainty.
Notes
"Contract no. EPA-IAG-D5-0799." University of Wisconsin Law School." "This study was conducted in cooperation with Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture." "Project Officer Curtis C. Harlin, Jr, Wastewater Management Branch, Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory." Issued Nov. 1977. The second volume that goes with this book has the Report numer EPA 600/2-78-175. Includes bibliographical references (pages 50-58). V. 1. An overview.
Contents Notes
1. Introduction -- 2. Conclusions -- 3. Riparian States -- Law of natural watercourses -- Law of surface waters -- Law of ground water -- 4. Appropriation states -- Doctrine of appropriation -- Law of natural watercourses -- Law of surface waters -- Law of groundwaters. This research project was undertaken with the overall objective of analyzing state water rights law in order to determine its possible impact on systems of land application of wastewater. It was determined that most states do not have regulations spe cifically controlling land application of wastewater, and that an analysis would have to be undertaken of basic state water law principles which, for the most part, have been developed with entirely different uses of water in mind. Several basic dichotomies were noted which could have some impact on the treatment of land application systems in different locations. There is a basic distinction between the "riparian" states of hte East, which emphasize the right of each riparian landowner along a watercourse to the use of the water, and the "appropriation" states of the West, which emphasize that the right inures to the prior user of the water. In addition, most states in both the reparian and appropriation categories distinguish between "natural watercourses," "surface water," and "groundwater," with different legal considerations and results frequently occurring in different categories of water within the same state. Occasional abstract legal requirements of absolute purity of waters were found which, if literally applied, could pose adverse implications for any innovative uses of water, including land application. For the most part, state water rights law was found to contain enough flexibility, through its emphasis on encouraging "reasonable" uses of water, to enable land application systems to operate free from legal uncertainty.