Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 7 OF 13

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Paint coatings : controlled field and chamber experiments /
Author Edney, Edward.
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Lab.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory,
Year Published 1989
Report Number EPA/600/3-89/032
Stock Number PB89-189849
Subjects Paint--Effect of air pollution on. ; Coatings--Research--North Carolina. ; Coatings--Research--Ohio.
Additional Subjects Air pollution ; Weathering ; Paints ; Protective coatings ; Exposure ; Sulfur dioxide ; PH ; Nitric acid ; Alkalinity ; Dissolving ; Controlled atmospheres ; Zinc oxides ; Aluminum ; Field tests ; Tables(Data) ; Acid rain
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB89-189849 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 01/01/1988
Collation 20 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Abstract
To determine the impact of pollution levels on the weathering rates of coatings, laboratory chamber experiments and controlled field exposures at North Carolina and Ohio sites were conducted in such a manner to separate the contributions due to dry deposition, wet deposition, precipitation pH, etc. The results of these studies confirm that acidic gases such as SO2 and HNO3, as well as acids within rain, promote the dissolution of alkaline components including CaCO3, ZnO, and Al flake from paint films. It is unclear from these studies whether the removal of these components reduces the service life or protective properties of the paint film. Other researchers within the Coatings Effects Program are conducting subsequent analyses to determine micro-damage of these paints. The uptake of acidic gases to painted surfaces is a complex process that depends on several factors. The deposition rate of SO2 to a wet, painted surface may be controlled by the level of oxidants such as H2O2.
Notes
Caption title. "April 1989." "EPA/600/3-89/032." Microfiche.