2012 Progress Report: Characterization Of Emissions From Small, Variable Solid Fuel Combustion Sources For Determining Global Emissions And Climate Impact

EPA Grant Number: R835036
Title: Characterization Of Emissions From Small, Variable Solid Fuel Combustion Sources For Determining Global Emissions And Climate Impact
Investigators: Edwards, Rufus D. , Bond, Tami C. , Smith, Kirk R.
Institution: University of California - Irvine , University of California - Berkeley , University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Current Institution: University of California - Irvine
EPA Project Officer: Katz, Taylor
Project Period: September 1, 2011 through August 31, 2014 (Extended to August 31, 2016)
Project Period Covered by this Report: September 1, 2011 through August 31,2012
Project Amount: $900,000
RFA: Black Carbon's Role In Global To Local Scale Climate And Air Quality (2010) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Global Climate Change , Climate Change , Air

Objective:

Obtain climate-relevant data from in field measurements of household stoves and rural small-scale industries, using a combination of real-time measurements, intensive chemical characterization, and statistical analysis.

Progress Summary:

In the first year of this project, climate relevant emissions properties of cook stoves and some small-scale industries were measured in two field sites in Nepal and Tibet. Emission factors include climate-relevant emission properties for particulate matter such as: (1) PM2.5 particulate mass using Teflon filters and gravimetric analysis, (2) black carbon and organic matter using quartz filters and thermal optical analysis, and (3) real-time emissions using a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) operating with three wavelengths (467, 530 and 660 nm). Emission factors also include emission properties for carbon dioxide, other short-lived climate forcers (carbon monoxide, methane and non-methane hydrocarbons), and sulfur dioxide. To evaluate potential health implications associated with the emissions from each stove fuel combination, and the potential health and climate co-benefits of clean burning stoves, indoor air concentrations of PM2.5 particulate matter and carbon monoxide were also monitored.

In Nepal, 62 homes and eight small-scale industries and eight other sources were measured in two different areas - the mid hills and plains areas. In homes, fuels used were wood, dung, and agricultural residues (Sugarcane and dried shrubs) using traditional chulas. Fuels for roadside vendors, pottery makers and candy making small-scale industries were biomass.

In Tibet, 64 households (tents, garrets and prefab houses) were measured in two different areas – Namco and Linzhi. In homes, fuels used were wood and yak dung using traditional stoves with no flue, and new stoves with a flue. Measurements were conducted in three residence types; tents, stone house and prefabricated houses.

Future Activities:

In the forthcoming year of the project emissions, our collaborators in Haryana, India will facilitate the monitoring of approximately 60 household cookstoves and 15 small-scale industries in February-April. During the summer, our collaborators in Yunnan, China will facilitate the monitoring of similar numbers of household cookstoves and small-scale industries.

Journal Articles:

No journal articles submitted with this report: View all 18 publications for this project

Progress and Final Reports:

Original Abstract
2013 Progress Report
2014 Progress Report
2015 Progress Report
Final Report