Associations of Short-Term Pollution Exposures with Childhood Autoimmune Disease

EPA Grant Number: R834992
Title: Associations of Short-Term Pollution Exposures with Childhood Autoimmune Disease
Investigators: Zeft, Andrew S. , Pope, Clive Arden
Institution: Brigham Young University
Current Institution: Cleveland Clinic Foundation , Brigham Young University
EPA Project Officer: Ilacqua, Vito
Project Period: June 1, 2011 through May 31, 2014 (Extended to May 31, 2015)
Project Amount: $298,857
RFA: Exploring New Air Pollution Health Effects Links in Existing Datasets (2010) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Air Quality and Air Toxics , Health Effects , Air

Objective:

Autoimmune diseases affect 15% of the US population, cause significant morbidity, and impose a profound financial burden on the country. The triggers of clinical disease presentation and exacerbation are unclear; however, our preliminary data suggests that short-term PM2.5 exposures are associated with the clinical presentation of juvenile idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) in young children. We will further test the hypothesis that clinical autoimmune disease presentation and exacerbation are associated with exposures to short-term pollution, including PM2.5, constituents of PM2.5, and 03.

Approach:

In Objective 1, we will further establish associations between short-term PM2.5 exposure and the clinical onset of Systemic Onset juvenile Idiopathic Arthritics (SoJIA), a subtype of JIA. Cases are from existing physician operated So JIA datasets diagnosed in the metropolitan regions of Toronto, Boston, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, and Atlanta, A case-crossover study design will be used to define associations of short-term PM2.5 and O3 exposures with the event date of SoJIA symptom onset from these regions, In Objective 2, we will establish associations between short-term ambient PM2.5 and its constituents (organic, metal, mineral-dominated PM2.5) and O3 and the clinical onset of Kawasaki Disease (KD). Cases are from existing physician operated KD datasets in the metropolitan regions of Salt Lake City, Toronto, Boston, Chicago, and San Diego. A case-crossover study design will define associations of short-term PM2.5 and O3 with the event date of KD fever onset from these regions. In a secondary analysis we will use STN data to examine whether categorized organic, metal, or mineral-dominated PM2.5 plays a role in KD onset. In Objective 3, we will establish associations between short-term PM2.5 and O3 exposures and clinical disease activity of Henoch Schonlein Purpura (HSP). Cases arise from an existing database of hospitalized children with HSP diagnosed in Salt Lake City, Cincinnati, Boston, Chicago, San Diego, Philadelphia, and Atlanta. A case-crossover study design will define associations of short-term PM2.5 and O3 with the event date of HSP hospital admission stratified by parameters of disease activity. We are examining representative autoimmune diseases for the purpose of gaining further understanding of the effects of acute, short-term pollution exposures on the clinical presentation of autoimmune diseases. Study results will help establish EPA air standards, and guide efforts to reduce risks to health from air pollution.

Publications and Presentations:

Publications have been submitted on this project: View all 10 publications for this project

Journal Articles:

Journal Articles have been submitted on this project: View all 2 journal articles for this project

Supplemental Keywords:

Urban Air Quality, Climate, Personal Exposure, Health Risks, Air Toxics, Air Quality, Ambient Particle Properties, Atmospheric Monitoring, Cumulative Exposure, Children's Health

Progress and Final Reports:

2011 Progress Report
2012 Progress Report
2013 Progress Report
Final Report