Examining In-Vehicle Pollution and Oxidative Stress in a Cohort of Daily Commuters

EPA Grant Number: R834799C002
Subproject: this is subproject number 002 , established and managed by the Center Director under grant R834799
(EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).

Center: The Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology: Multiscale Measurements and Modeling of Mixtures
Center Director: Tolbert, Paige
Title: Examining In-Vehicle Pollution and Oxidative Stress in a Cohort of Daily Commuters
Investigators: Sarnat, Jeremy , Bergin, Michael , Brown, Lou Ann , Darrow, Lyndsey , Fitzpatrick, Anne , Flanders, Dana , Greenwald, Roby , Guensler, Randy , Wongtrakool, Cherry
Current Investigators: Sarnat, Jeremy , Bergin, Michael , Diaz-Sanchez, David , Flanders, Dana , Greenwald, Roby , Winquist, Andrea
Institution: Emory University , Georgia Institute of Technology
Current Institution: Emory University , Duke University , Georgia Institute of Technology , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
EPA Project Officer: Hunt, Sherri
Project Period: January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2016
RFA: Clean Air Research Centers (2009) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Health Effects , Air

Objective:

Vehicle emissions comprise a complex mixture of particulate and gaseous pollutants that have been linked to numerous adverse health outcomes. Despite this, there is limited knowledge concerning in-vehicle mixtures and corresponding acute health responses among daily automobile commuters. A more complete understanding of the pollutant- related health effects in commuters is becoming increasingly necessary, as commuting durations as well as roadway congestion have steadily increased throughout the U.S. during the last 20 years. To investigate in-vehicle exposures among car commuters, we propose to conduct a panel- based exposure and health assessment study of 30 healthy and 30 asthmatic adults in the metropolitan Atlanta area. The primary objective of this study is to examine the associations between particulate mixtures that occur during typical automobile commuting and corresponding oxidative stress-mediated pathways of cardiorespiratory injury. Our central hypotheses are that: 1) commuters are exposed to high levels of in-vehicle particulate pollutant mixtures as compared to other, indoor microenvironments (μE’s); and that 2) these short-term exposures are associated with acute changes in oxidative stress in asthmatic and healthy adults.

Approach:

We will use novel methods for measuring highly chemically-resolved PM, focusing on specific particulate components that contribute to PM oxidative potential including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, transition metal species, elemental carbon and ultrafine particles. In addition, this study will be among the first to measure several highly-sensitive, non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress (i.e., glutathione in exhaled breath) at numerous time intervals, with the goal of following the progression from oxidative stress to clinical response.

Expected Results:

This project is particularly suited towards EPA’s stated research questions (RQ) for examining the health effects of air pollutant mixtures. Expected exposure science results will further our understanding of: in-vehicle concentrations of size- and chemically-resolved PM mixtures within periods of peak traffic; the impact of exposure factors such as cabin ventilation and traffic composition on in-vehicle pollutant levels; and how exposures to specific ROS generating PM components vary between in-vehicle and other indoor μE’s (RQ 2). In addition, this study will elucidate several key health effects questions, including: the acute, sub-clinical oxidative stress-mediated responses due to real-world exposures to traffic-related PM, its components and pollutant mixtures using individual-specific metrics of personal exposure (RQ 5, RQ 6), the temporality of these exposure- response functions(RQ 4); whether daily commuters comprise a potentially vulnerable sub- population to these health effects during commuting (RQ 3); and whether baseline health status, and specifically asthma, modifies the risk of traffic PM.

Publications and Presentations:

Publications have been submitted on this subproject: View all 32 publications for this subprojectView all 301 publications for this center

Journal Articles:

Journal Articles have been submitted on this subproject: View all 7 journal articles for this subprojectView all 99 journal articles for this center

Supplemental Keywords:

health effects, oxidative stress, inflammation, human health, susceptibility, vulnerability, PARs, PM2.5, organics, elemental carbon, metals, ozone, oxidants, PAH, sulfates, source characterization, mobile sources, Georgia, GA,, Health, Scientific Discipline, Health Risk Assessment, Risk Assessments, Biochemistry, Environmental Monitoring, children's health, particulate matter, ambient air monitoring, climate change, automobile exhaust, air pollution, traffic density, airshed modeling, ambient particle health effects, human health risk

Progress and Final Reports:

2011 Progress Report
2012 Progress Report
2013 Progress Report
2014 Progress Report
2015 Progress Report
Final Report


Main Center Abstract and Reports:

R834799    The Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology: Multiscale Measurements and Modeling of Mixtures

Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
R834799C001 Development and Deployment of an Instrumentation Suite for Comprehensive Air Quality Characterization Including Aerosol ROS
R834799C002 Examining In-Vehicle Pollution and Oxidative Stress in a Cohort of Daily Commuters
R834799C003 Novel Estimates of Pollutant Mixtures and Pediatric Health in Two Birth Cohorts
R834799C004 A Multi-City Time-Series Study of Pollutant Mixtures and Acute Morbidity