Exposure Mapping – Characterization of Gases and Particles for ExposureAssessment in Health Effects and Laboratory Studies

EPA Grant Number: R834796C001
Subproject: this is subproject number 001 , established and managed by the Center Director under grant R834796
(EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).

Center: University of Washington Center for Clean Air Research
Center Director: Vedal, Sverre
Title: Exposure Mapping – Characterization of Gases and Particles for ExposureAssessment in Health Effects and Laboratory Studies
Investigators: Yost, Michael , Jobson, B. Thomas , Larson, Timothy V. , Simpson, Chris , VanReken, Timothy M.
Institution: University of Washington , Washington State University
EPA Project Officer: Callan, Richard
Project Period: December 1, 2010 through November 30, 2015 (Extended to November 30, 2017)
RFA: Clean Air Research Centers (2009) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Air Quality and Air Toxics , Air

Objective:

Roadway-source air pollutants encompass a diversity of chemicals, including both particulate and gas phase components which are transformed by chemical and physical reactions as they age in the environment. Consequently, human exposures to air pollutants can range from relatively un-aged to highly aged components that vary with respect to particle size and the chemical composition of particle and gas phase components. This proposal is will employ mobile and fixed site monitoring to assess both gas and particle components of these pollutants as they age from roadway sources to population areas, for a more comprehensive understanding of the seasonal and spatial variability in the concentration and composition of air pollutant exposures within MESA-Air cities.

The main project objectives are:

  1. Characterize spatial and temporal gradients of selected air pollutants along roadways and within neighborhoods in MESA cities using a mobile platform;
  2. Measure spatial variation in concentrations of selected air pollutants at two-week average fixed sites in coordination with the mobile measurements.
  3. Characterize aging of air pollutant components transported from roadway sources to neighborhood receptor locations; and
  4. Provide detailed characterization of laboratory exposure conditions available for toxicology testing, and identify likely conditions that mimic those found in urban settings.

Approach:

We will:

  1. use mobile monitoring with an instrument platform designed to measure concentrations of particles and gases while continuously on the move. These data will be used by the Biostatistics Core to develop multivariate spatial models of selected roadway-source air pollutants for use in health studies, and to characterize the aging of air pollutant components as they are transported from sources to populated areas;
  2. use passive monitoring at approximately 20 stationary sites in each of the four MESA cities to measure concentrations of coarse particles, gases (O3, SO2, NO, NO2), and selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These measurements will be used in conjunction with the mobile measurements to develop multivariate spatial models of selected roadway-source air pollutants;
  3. characterize the laboratory exposure conditions available for toxicology testing, and identify likely conditions that mimic those found in urban settings.This will be achieved by deploying the same instruments used in the mobile monitoring platform, along with LRRI instruments and additional high sensitivity mass-spectrometer instruments only available for the laboratory facilities (Aerosol TOF-MS for particles and PTR-MS for VOCs).

Expected Results:

In this project, we will:

  1. develop multivariate spatial models of selected roadway-source air pollutants for use in health studies;
  2. characterize the aging of roadway source air pollutant components as they are transported from sources to populated areas;
  3. characterize the laboratory multi-pollutant atmospheres for toxicology testing, to help describe physical and chemical transformation processes occurring in the laboratory and to help determine the comparability of conditions generated by in the laboratory to those observed in the field.

Publications and Presentations:

Publications have been submitted on this subproject: View all 40 publications for this subprojectView all 172 publications for this center

Journal Articles:

Journal Articles have been submitted on this subproject: View all 17 journal articles for this subprojectView all 75 journal articles for this center

Supplemental Keywords:

exposure science, community exposures, chemical transport;, Health, Scientific Discipline, Air, ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, Air Quality, air toxics, Health Risk Assessment, Risk Assessments, mobile sources, Biochemistry, Environmental Monitoring, Atmospheric Sciences, Risk Assessment, ambient air quality, particulate matter, atmospheric particulate matter, air pollutants, vehicle emissions, aerosol particles, motor vehicle emissions, air quality models, airway disease, bioavailability, motor vehicle exhaust, air pollution, particle exposure, atmospheric aerosols, ambient particle health effects, vascular dysfunction, cardiotoxicity, atmospheric chemistry, cardiovascular disease

Progress and Final Reports:

2011 Progress Report
2012 Progress Report
2013 Progress Report
2015 Progress Report
2016 Progress Report


Main Center Abstract and Reports:

R834796    University of Washington Center for Clean Air Research

Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
R834796C001 Exposure Mapping – Characterization of Gases and Particles for ExposureAssessment in Health Effects and Laboratory Studies
R834796C002 Simulated Roadway Exposure Atmospheres for Laboratory Animal and Human Studies
R834796C003 Cardiovascular Consequences of Immune Modification by Traffic-Related Emissions
R834796C004 Vascular Response to Traffic-Derived Inhalation in Humans
R834796C005 Effects of Long-Term Exposure to Traffic-Derived Particles and Gases on Subclinical Measures of Cardiovascular Disease in a Multi-Ethnic Cohort