Spatial Investigation of Sources, Composition, and Long-Term Health Effects of Coarse Particulate Matter (PM10-2.5) in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Cohort

EPA Grant Number: R833741
Title: Spatial Investigation of Sources, Composition, and Long-Term Health Effects of Coarse Particulate Matter (PM10-2.5) in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Cohort
Investigators: Larson, Timothy V. , Adar, Sara D. , Barr, R. Graham , Burke, Gregory L. , Daviglus, Martha , Jacobs, David , Kaufman, Joel D. , Sheppard, Lianne (Elizabeth) A. , Simpson, Chris
Current Investigators: Larson, Timothy V. , Adar, Sara D. , Barr, R. Graham , Burke, Gregory L. , Daviglus, Martha , Jacobs, David , Kaufman, Joel D. , Sheppard, Lianne (Elizabeth) A. , Simpson, Chris , Szpiro, Adam
Institution: University of Washington , Columbia University in the City of New York , Northwestern University , University of Minnesota , Wake Forest University
EPA Project Officer: Hunt, Sherri
Project Period: March 1, 2008 through February 28, 2013
Project Amount: $1,199,217
RFA: Sources, Composition, and Health Effects of Coarse Particulate Matter (2006) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Air , Air Quality and Air Toxics , Particulate Matter

Objective:

Although there is ample evidence that fine airborne particles (median diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) are detrimental to human health, the importance of larger, “coarse” particles (2.5-10 μm) is less clear. Uncertainties are especially evident for chronic health effects, due to an incomplete understanding of spatial differences in coarse mass and composition. This proposal aims to characterize the spatial variability of coarse particles from natural and anthropogenic sources and examine their associations with cardiovascular and respiratory disease.

Approach:

Using the platform of the NIH/NHLBI Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis cohort (MESA), we will develop spatially-dependent concentration estimates of coarse particles and selected components for individual participants. We will then link these estimates to the rich dataset of clinical and sub-clinical respiratory and cardiovascular health outcomes to establish concentration-effect relationships for long-term exposure to coarse pollutants. This will be performed for over 6,000 subjects, aged 50-89, that are being followed over a 5 to 11 year period as part of a MESA ancillary study, the MESA Air Pollution project, which is now studying only fine particles.

Coarse particle and selected component concentrations will be estimated using chemically speciated data and endotoxin measurements, collected concurrently outside selected participants’ homes in each of 3 cities during 2 distinct seasons. These data will be combined with geographic information, including land use, proximity to sources, and vegetative cover, to predict concentrations of coarse particles from natural and anthropogenic sources for each participant.

We will examine the relationship of long-term exposure to coarse PM with: 1) incident clinical cardiovascular events; 2) progression of sub-clinical atherosclerosis as indicated by repeated measures of carotid artery intima-media thickness and coronary artery calcification; and 3) progression of sub-clinical chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as indicated by repeated lung density measures. This work will complement the aims of the existing EPA-funded MESA Air Pollution study, which examines the long-term health effects of fine but not coarse particulate pollution.

Expected Results:

This study will provide new and critically important information on the within-city variability of coarse particles and source-specific components and their relation to cardiovascular and pulmonary disease.

Publications and Presentations:

Publications have been submitted on this project: View all 15 publications for this project

Journal Articles:

Journal Articles have been submitted on this project: View all 5 journal articles for this project

Supplemental Keywords:

ambient air, air pollution, coarse PM, epidemiology, chronic health effects,, RFA, Scientific Discipline, Air, particulate matter, Health Risk Assessment, Biology, atmospheric particulate matter, sensitive populations, atmospheric particles, cardiopulmonary responses, human health effects, bioavailability, cardiovascular vulnerability, sensitive subgroups, cardiotoxicity, exposure assessment

Progress and Final Reports:

2008 Progress Report
2009 Progress Report
2010 Progress Report
2011 Progress Report
Final Report