2012 Progress Report: Health Effects and Characterization of Urban and Rural Coarse ParticulateMatter in Northeastern Colorado

EPA Grant Number: R833744
Title: Health Effects and Characterization of Urban and Rural Coarse ParticulateMatter in Northeastern Colorado
Investigators: Hannigan, Michael P. , Milford, Jana B. , Miller, Shelly , Navidi, William C. , Peel, Jennifer
Institution: University of Colorado at Boulder , Colorado School of Mines , Colorado State University
EPA Project Officer: Chung, Serena
Project Period: January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2012 (Extended to June 30, 2013)
Project Period Covered by this Report: January 1, 2012 through December 31,2012
Project Amount: $1,200,000
RFA: Sources, Composition, and Health Effects of Coarse Particulate Matter (2006) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Air , Air Quality and Air Toxics , Particulate Matter

Objective:

This research project was designed to investigate associations between coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) mass concentrations and several health outcomes in a pair of urban and rural communities:  Denver and Greeley, CO, and to characterize the particle composition and origin in both communities.  

Progress Summary:

During the fifth year, we spent the bulk of our efforts on wrapping up data collection. The network of continuous PM10-2.5 and PM 2.5  mass monitoring was completed in the spring of 2012. The network of PM10-2.5/PM2.5 filter samplers were operated every sixth day for 1 year spanning 2010-11. The filters from that network were analyzed for mass and EC/OC, with the completion of ECOC happening in 2012. The big step forward on filter analysis besides mass loading was biological characterization done by N. Fierer’s group at CU. This work was done mostly under the scope of a second EPA STAR grant so the progress on that will be described in more detail in that progress report. Additionally, all PM Teflon filters were sent to the University of Wisconsin for metals and ROS analysis, which was completed in 2012. The group’s first manuscript from the CRUSH study was published in Aerosol Science and Technology in 2012. This article focused on spatiotemporal analysis of PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass in Denver and Greeley. Two additional manuscripts neared completion by the end of 2012:  one describing the filter analysis for metal and one describing potential errors in continuous PM mass measurements.

Characterization via Filter Sample Collection. The highlight of the filter charterization work in year 5 was the analysis for trace metals, which were then used to help identify PM origins, as well as exploring temporal and spatial trends. One approach that we undertook to explore PM origins is source apportionment analysis where we used all the filter trace metal analyses. The results of this analysis are shown in Table 1. We identified five factors contributing to the trace element concentrations:  a crustal factor contributing to both PM2.5 and PM10-2.5; a sodium-dominated PM10-2.5 factor likely associated with road salt; a vehicle abrasion factor contributing in both size ranges; a regional sulfur factor contributing mainly to PM2.5 and likely associated with coal combustion; and a local catalyst factor primarily contributing Ce and La in PM2.5 at one of the sites in Denver. Notice that the largest difference between Denver and Greeley is the lower vehicle abrasion contribution in Greeley.

Table 1. Average factor contributions to summed concentrations of 27 elements, by size and site.

 

Road Salt

Crustal

Regional Sulfate

Vehicle Abrasion

Local Catalyst

 

Absolute Element Contributions (ng/m3)

ALS F

29.6±28.7

87.5±111

196±89.5

79.3±81.3

51.5±37.0

EDI F

26.0±17.8

50.3±52.7

245±112

49.8±29.8

15.0±12.2

GRE F

20.0±14.9

69.8±57.4

152±97.2

15.8±12.8

3.65±1.88

ALS C

136±162

331±197

19.3±11.5

39.7±42.5

25.7±16.5

EDI C

77.0±66.1

182±102

21.1±10.3

49.1±44.0

8.66±4.28

GRE C

49.0±42.6

245±207

23.1±23.2

12.2±18.5

7.14±4.61

 

Future Activities:

We have started the health modeling efforts and anticipate that this effort will be completed by end of June 2013. We have completed all of the filter analysis with the exception of the water soluble OC, but we anticipate completion of WSOC analysis in May 2013. As such, all filter analysis should be complete in the spring of 2013. The addition of the water soluble carbon analysis will allow us to create a carbon-focused manuscript, which should be in draft form in the summer of 2013. A final manuscript that pulls all of these pieces together to synthesize how PM size and location impact composition and health effects will be finalized in the fall of 2013.


Journal Articles on this Report : 1 Displayed | Download in RIS Format

Other project views: All 14 publications 4 publications in selected types All 4 journal articles
Type Citation Project Document Sources
Journal Article Clements N, Piedrahita R, Ortega J, Peel JL, Hannigan M, Miller, SL, Milford JB. Characterization and nonparametric regression of rural and urban coarse particulate matter mass concentrations in Northeastern Colorado. Aerosol Science and Technology 2012;46(1):108-123. R833744 (2012)
R833744 (Final)
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  • Supplemental Keywords:

    Exposure, human health, dose-response, metals, epidemiology, modeling, RFA, Scientific Discipline, Air, Geographic Area, particulate matter, Health Risk Assessment, State, Biology, PM10, atmospheric particulate matter, cardiopulmonary responses, human health effects, atmospheric particles, bioavailability, cardiovascular vulnerability, cardiotoxicity, coarse pm, chemical speciation sampling, exposure assessment

    Progress and Final Reports:

    Original Abstract
  • 2008 Progress Report
  • 2009 Progress Report
  • 2010 Progress Report
  • 2011 Progress Report
  • Final Report