Final Report: Extension of Expertise on Design and Analysis to States and Tribes

EPA Grant Number: R829095C004
Subproject: this is subproject number 004 , established and managed by the Center Director under grant R829095
(EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).

Center: Space-Time Aquatic Resources Modeling and Analysis Program (STARMAP)
Center Director: Urquhart, N. Scott
Title: Extension of Expertise on Design and Analysis to States and Tribes
Investigators: Urquhart, N. Scott , Davis, Richard A. , Johnson, Stephen , Stevens, Don L.
Institution: Colorado State University , Oregon State University , Water Quality Technology, Inc.
EPA Project Officer: Hiscock, Michael
Project Period: October 1, 2001 through September 30, 2006
RFA: Research Program on Statistical Survey Design and Analysis for Aquatic Resources (2001) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Aquatic Ecosystems , Ecological Indicators/Assessment/Restoration , Water and Watersheds , Water , Ecosystems

Objective:

The objectives are to: (1) identify and establish the statistical needs of personnel in State and Tribal environmental management agencies (target audience); and (2) prepare, test, and deliver various (traditional, electronic, and Web-based) means of delivering relevant information to the target audience.

Summary/Accomplishments (Outputs/Outcomes):

The client community for the results of these two research programs consisted of aquatic monitoring scientists in state, tribal, federal, and more local agencies charged with monitoring aquatic resources in compliance with the Clean Water Act. Such aquatic scientists will be assisted by affiliated statisticians and landscape ecologists. Thus the outreach and extension efforts extended to each of these groups of scientists, using a variety of means. Program personnel:

  • Engaged in direct interaction with personnel in relevant state, tribal, and more local environmental agencies.
  • Interacted with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) personnel who have direct contact with aquatic monitoring personnel in the states and more local agencies.
  • Communicated with diverse members of the client community in a wide variety of conferences and other settings. They gave more than 200 talks and displayed at least 20 posters. The Program Directors organized and conducted five specialty conferences and made substantial contributions to the organization and execution of several other conferences; most of these conferences included international participants. One of the Directors edited two issues of the Journal of Environmental and Ecological Statistics as part of this communication effort.
  • Presented short courses and tutorials in several settings, some based on a textbook coauthored by one of the Program’s principal investigators (PIs).
  • Developed a set of browser-based learning materials suitable for self-study. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is free to utilize those materials as it sees fit.
  • Gave presentations to teachers and students in high school advanced placement statistics courses to interest students in possible careers in environmental statistics.

This Project had three main modes of outreach and extension: direct implementation of project tools in the design and execution of active state, regional, tribal, and more local monitoring efforts, primarily executed by Stevens (Designs and Models for Aquatic Resource Surveys; DAMARS) and Theobald (Space-Time Aquatic Resources Modeling and Analysis Program; STARMAP); a CD-ROM containing relevant learning materials, directed by Urquhart (STARMAP); and communication to various communities by publications, oral presentations, and posters in diverse contexts, executed by all members of both Programs.

Science To Achieve Results (STAR) Program Reporting Requirements specify the nature of this and three subsequent sections. Two additional sections are appropriate for this Project: a listing of specific outreach activities and a list of outreach communications, the latter organized by type of communication.

  • Most of the personnel of both STARMAP and DAMARS participated in interactions with various members of the client community, but major and sustained efforts in this area were made by Don Stevens, the Director of DAMARS, and David Theobald, a STARMAP PI. Don Stevens interacted throughout the Programs’ lives with the San Francisco Estuary Institute and other California agencies, and several Oregon state agencies. Toward the end of the Programs, he and, to a lesser extent, David Theobald and collaborators, interacted with the Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADF&G) on the design of monitoring activities related to Pacific salmon. David Theobald, a STARMAP landscape ecologist, developed GIS tools relevant to aquatic monitoring. The nature of each of these tools is documented in the report for Project 3. Theobald and collaborators made these tools available to diverse potential users and gave a number of presentations to the client community on their use; the requesters for these tools span a wide range of aquatic interests, including a surprising number from outside the United States. In the case of Alaska salmon they actually installed the software and demonstrated its use on computers of the ADF&G. Scott Urquhart, the STARMAP Director, had continuing interactions with the National Park Service’s Inventory and Monitoring Program, and with the San Diego Metropolitan Wastewater treatment activity in collaboration with Kerry Ritter of the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP).
  • STARMAP results have received international exposure, both by current investigators and former investigators who have gone on to other positions but continue to report on results originating from their work with STARMAP.

Significance of Accomplishments

This Project has effectively communicated the results of the STARMAP and DAMARS Programs to diverse members of the client community in a variety of effective ways. Most of the communications have been contemporary, but the CD-ROM-based learning materials can be used in several ways, including being available on the Internet.

Stakeholders and Users of Results

There are many potential users of the methods developed by STARMAP and DAMARS. The two Programs have organized and presented a number of conferences or parts of conferences directed specifically at potential users. Program personnel also have participated in a number of conferences at the invitation of potential users. Some of the conferences listed below are explained in more detail in sections below. The conferences listed immediately below had a major involvement of potential users of developed methods.

  • Don Stevens (DAMARS) and Tony Olsen (EPA, Western Ecology Division [WED]) presented the short course Spatial Sampling at the Joint Statistical Meetings, Seattle, WA, August 6-10, 2006.
  • David Theobald (STARMAP), John Norman (STARMAP), Erin Peterson (formerly of STARMAP), and Don Stevens (DAMARS) were the major presenters at the Workshop on Modeling Salmon Habitat, hosted by the ADF&G and The Nature Conservancy, Anchorage, AK, May 17-19, 2006. (See the section on Specific Outreach Activities for more detail.)
  • Conference on Statistics for Aquatic Resources Monitoring, Modeling, and Management (SARMMM), hosted by DAMARS: This was the Fourth Annual Conference on Statistical Survey Design and Analysis for Aquatic Resources, Corvallis, Oregon, September 7-9, 2005. It was well attended by both statisticians and natural resource managers, especially ones from the Pacific Northwest, but other attendees came from across the United States and several from other countries. This included a well-attended day-long short course (9/7/05) for natural resource managers on Designing Aquatic Resources Surveys.
  • Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium, Denver, CO, September 21-24, 2004: The STARMAP Director organized 2.5 days of sessions on the statistical aspects of natural resource surveys. Stevens (DAMARS) and Urquhart (STARMAP) made major presentations as a part of the short course. Three STARMAP graduate students also made presentations in other conference sessions. This short course was well attended by resource managers from throughout the United States and elsewhere in the Americas.
  • The Third Annual Conference on Statistical Survey Design and Analysis for Aquatic Resources, Fort Collins, CO, September 10-11, 2004, hosted by STARMAP: This conference was well attended by Program participants, statisticians, and natural resource managers, especially ones from EPA Region 8, but other attendees came from across the United States and included at least one international participant. The keynote address was given by an EPA resource manager.
  • Graybill Conference, June 16-18, 2004: This conference constituted outreach to the statistical community, providing STARMAP and DAMARS investigators with an opportunity to present some of their results to both established and young statisticians. It was attended by about 80 statisticians and was officially sponsored by STARMAP. The STARMAP Director served as editor of a special edition of Environmental and Ecological Statistics, which served as the conference proceedings, and provided an outlet for several young environmental statisticians. The keynote address was given by a member of the Programs’ Science Advisory Committee.
  • Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) Symposium 2004, Newport, RI, May 3-7, 2004: The STARMAP director organized a session on the statistical aspects of the linkage of Clean Water Act sections 305(b) and 303(d), and he and another STARMAP PI made presentations.
  • Temporal Sampling Workshop, Port Angeles, WA, November 12-14, 2003, sponsored by the National Park Service: Urquhart (STARMAP), and Stevens (DAMARS) gave invited talks, and Ranalli (STARMAP) participated.
  • The Second Annual Conference on Statistical Survey Design and Analysis for Aquatic Resources, Corvallis, OR, August 11-13, 2003, hosted by DAMARS: This conference was well attended by Program participants, statisticians, and local natural resource managers, including ones from EPA, WED, and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The keynote address was given by an EPA resource manager.
  • The First Annual Conference on Statistical Survey Design and Analysis for Aquatic Resources, Fort Collins, CO, September 20-21, 2002, hosted by STARMAP: It was well attended by Program participants, statisticians, and local natural resource managers, including ones from EPA Region 8. The keynote address was given by an EPA resource manager.

How Products Will Further Science/Management of Resources

The products of this project are both tangible (the manuscripts, presentations, software, and learning tools) and intangible (the insight and knowledge of environmental sampling that has been passed on to non-statistician environmental scientists and managers). The tangible products developed by STARMAP and DAMARS provide an expanded tool kit for designing, monitoring, and analyzing the data resulting from studies of aquatic resources at a variety of levels, from national surveys to studies near a single oceanic sewage outfall. The intangible products have the potential for greater impact on how the resources of this Nation are managed. DAMARS and STARMAP have demonstrated the utility of rigorous statistical design and analysis of environmental monitoring programs to diverse parts of the client community for which these tools were developed and evaluated. Thus, we have not only provided tools, but we have provided the tools to people who are in a position to apply them, and given them the knowledge to do so. There is substantial evidence that the use of the tool kit is spreading…more states, tribes, federal agencies, even other countries, are recognizing its utility.

Listing of Specific Outreach Activities

YEAR 5 (October 1, 2005 - September 30, 2006)

  • Personnel under STARMAP Project 3 collaborated with other STAR researchers, especially ones at Colorado State University (CSU), EPA personnel at WED, and in the states and other agencies in developing, implementing, and testing relevant GIS tools.
    • For example, this project’s current and former investigators actively participated in a Workshop on Modeling Salmon Habitat, hosted by the ADF&G and The Nature Conservancy, Anchorage, Alaska, May 17-19, 2006. The ADF&G is responsible, according to state legislation, for locating freshwater anadromous fish habitat and documenting each stream segment in the Anadromous Waters Catalogue that is used by anadromous fish. Since the majority of Alaskan waters have never been surveyed, an efficient method for identifying which waters have a high probability of use is an important step in prioritizing on-ground surveys. ADF&G invited biologists, GIS specialists, and managers from around Alaska and researchers from around the United States and the world (Australia and Japan) to come for 3 days. The first day was devoted to an overview of fish biology and some of the challenges that the managers were facing. The second day speakers described specific datasets, such as PRISM and NHD, that were available and how the Alaska datasets were different from similar ones in the conterminous United States. The afternoon session dealt with GIS tools and methodologies, at which Dave Theobald and Erin Peterson (a former STARMAP doctoral student) gave their presentations, which could be used for predicting salmon habitat. Presentations by other researchers concerned modeling fish habitat, fish distribution, and conservation areas. Statistical methods were described on the third day. Jay Ver Hoef (STARMAP Science Advisory Committee Chair) talked about the spatial models and also gave a presentation about spatial design. Don Stevens (DAMARS) gave a talk about probability-based design. On the last day everyone who attended the workshop was involved in a discussion about which approach the ADF&G should use. During the modeling portion of the discussion, the mediator started by saying that he had already decided to use the spatial models investigated and used by STARMAP investigators. That was not surprising as they had already invested so much time developing the GIS datasets. On the other hand, they must not have seen a more relevant method. Theobald, Peterson, Norman, and Ver Hoef continued collaborations over the subsequent weekend with the ADF&G statisticians, GIS analysts, and Mike Wiedmer, who is the manager in charge of the anadromous fish sampling. The STARMAP group got the GIS tools working and the ADF&G datasets formatted correctly. Ver Hoef tested his code so that they would be able to use it, and Theobald showed them the RRQRR tools for their sampling design. They decided to use the probability-based survey design that Stevens had presented. The breadth of the DAMARS/STARMAP presence at this meeting illustrates the substantial influence these two programs have had on environmental sampling and monitoring, especially in aquatic systems.
    • The STARMAP group (Theobald and Norman) applied their FLoWS tools and database to construct basic data needed by The Nature Conservancy to conduct their Central Shortgrass Prairie Ecoregional Assessment.
    • The GIS tools have substantial lists of adopters. Users listed under STARMAP Project 3 (R829095C003) include a wide variety of domestic agencies, including several parts of EPA, in at least 18 states, as well users in at least 11 other countries.
  • Don Stevens has continued his direct outreach efforts of behalf of both STARMAP and DAMARS:
    • Stevens attended a 2-day workshop in Corvallis, Oregon, April 17 and 18, 2006, on effectiveness monitoring sponsored by the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. He gave a presentation entitled “Importance of Scale, Sampling Design, and Statistics in Effectiveness Monitoring.”
    • Stevens presented two talks in Europe during the summer of 2006. Although the trips were funded by another source, the talks publicized DAMARS/STARMAP research. The invited talk “Using a Master Sample to Coordinate Monitoring of Multiple Species,” by Don L. Stevens, Jr., David P. Larsen, and Anthony R. Olsen, was presented at the meeting of The International Environmetrics Society (TIES) in Kalmar, Sweden, and the talk “Spatial Properties of Design-based Versus Model-based Approaches to Environmental Sampling” by Don L. Stevens, Jr., was presented at ACCURACY 2006: The Seventh International Symposium on Spatial Accuracy Assessment in Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, Lisbon, Portugal. This talk also was published in the proceedings of the Symposium.
    • Stevens was elected as the North American Representative to the Executive Board of TIES. He is also serving as the Continuing Education Officer for the Section on Statistics and the Environment of the American Statistical Association.
    • Stevens has continued work with ODFW on design and analysis of coho salmon monitoring. A major effort during the third quarter was developing methodology to modify the frame for the ODFW coastal coho sample. Since the original sample was drawn in 1998, the frame has changed substantially, both with addition of newly identified coho-bearing streams and elimination of non-accessible stream reaches. Moreover, the objective has changed from obtaining estimates at the scale of monitoring areas (five covering the Oregon coast) to obtaining estimates at the coho population level (30 more or less distinct populations on the coast).
    • Stevens has worked with the team developing the California Rapid Assessment Method (CRAM) for Wetlands. Most recently, the focus has been on calibrating CRAM to more intensive methods of wetland condition assessment. The next phase of the study will be to implement CRAM statewide.
    • Oregon State University (OSU) Graduate students Jessica Merville and Bill Gaeuman have been working with the ODFW to extend adaptive sampling techniques to stream networks. The particular focus has been on developing efficient ways to sample bull trout redds in Eastern Oregon streams. ODFW has census data on several stream networks that Merville and Gaeuman have been using to compare different sampling strategies.
  • Urquhart and Ritter met with personnel of the San Diego Metropolitan Wastewater District to obtain data and metadata from a near-coastal project they helped design 2 years ago. Ritter analyzed these data to evaluate the design, and gave a talk about the methods at California and the World Ocean Conference 2006.
  • Giovanna Ranalli continued her collaboration with Henry A. Walker, EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), Atlantic Ecology Division, Narragansett, RI, and Phillip Trowbridge, New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, Concord, NH. (See STARMAP Project 2 [R829095C002], also a DAMARS project, for further information on this.)
  • The National Park Service has an Inventory and Monitoring Program which shares many features and approaches with EMAP. The STARMAP Director has collaborated with the design team of that program on various technical aspects of monitoring. Urquhart was invited to participate in that program’s annual meeting and gave a talk on “Designing Surveys over Time (Panel Surveys): Variance, Power and Related Topics,” San Diego on February 10, 2006.
  • Jay Araas, Master’s student in statistics, converted the oral presentations he videotaped at WED in June 2004, into pdf files where all of the presentation talks have been converted into textual material which can be displayed with PowerPoint slides in a side-by-side pdf format. A copy of his Masters Report is Web available at the link given in the complete output listing in the Final Report Summary for R829095, which is the overall Center report for the STARMAP Center.

YEAR 4 (October 1, 2004 - September 30, 2005)

  • Development of browser-based learning materials continued. A decision to represent all material in pdf format had been made, and Stacey Hancock, a CSU statistics graduate student, incorporated video clips of the field training into the materials. Hari Iyer became actively involved in this effort.
    • A CSU graduate student attended and videotaped the EMAP training session at EPA’s WED Laboratory in May 2004. This material has been incorporated into part 4 of the learning materials.
  • Wetlands are included in aquatic systems. Urquhart participated, June 14-15, 2005, in a review of the methodology being used for the upcoming National Wetlands Status and Trends report, due out in December 2005. This produced other contacts, and a wetlands data set whose investigation just started:
    • Personnel of Minnesota’s Department of Natural Resources are designing an expanded (over the National Wetlands Inventory’s [NWI] 175 plots) sampling of wetlands. Urquhart assisted in that design effort. Personnel there supplied STARMAP with the areas of 17 wetland classes for Minnesota’s 175 NWI 2-mile square plots, and the analogous data for the plots divided into four and 16 subplots. The objective of this was to incorporate costs into making decisions about optimal size of wetland monitoring plots. Preliminary spatial analysis is interesting.
    • He also collaborated with Brian Gray of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on this trip.
  • The STARMAP Director actively recruited high school students into statistics by giving talks to two advanced placement statistics classes in a Fort Collins high school. Scheduling constraints in previously visited high schools precluded revisits this reporting year.
  • Other STAR Grantees:
    • Alix Gitelman continued collaborations with Ken Reckhow of the North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute.
    • Collaborative relations continued with PIs Hoeting and Theobald and with these CSU investigators, also funded by EPA’s STAR program: LeRoy Poff (Biology), Brian Bledsoe (Civil Engineering), and Will Clements (Fish and Wildlife Biology). A new statistics student has begun working closely with Bledsoe.
    • Urquhart finished editing a special issue of Environmental and Ecological Statistics, based on the Graybill Conference for which he served as program chair.
  • Stevens planned and executed the Fourth Joint Annual Program Meeting. This meeting was a success in terms of both content and attendees. DAMARS and STARMAP personnel continued to work with the ODFW on the joint sessions.
  • Doctoral student Leigh Ann Harrod (DAMARS) created a manual titled “Ignorable Nonresponse Adjustment Procedures and Algorithms,” with an accompanying CD-ROM. The manual guides the user through data analysis for probability-based survey data with nonresponse, provides documentation for the weighting adjustment functions, and provides a copy of the R software. Harrod gave a presentation of the software as a part of the short course given in conjunction with SARMMM.
  • Don Stevens continued his direct outreach efforts of behalf of both STARMAP and DAMARS:
    • Stevens visited the San Francisco Estuary Institute (SFEI) October 18-20, 2004. SFEI has used a Generalized Random Tessellation Stratified (GRTS)-based rotating panel design for monitoring trace contaminants in the San Francisco estuary since 2002. Stevens worked with personnel at SFEI on the analysis of data resulting from a variable probability survey design, and acquainted them with the R software for survey design being developed by Tony Olsen at EPA NHEERL-WED.
    • Stevens visited with Mathematics faculty and students at Eastern Oregon State University in La Grande, Oregon, on November 3 and 4, 2004. The purpose of the visit was to interest potential graduate students in environmental statistics. He presented a seminar on “Environmental Monitoring, Statistics, and the Art of Non-Representation: The Need and Evidence for a Paradigm Shift”. He also visited a mathematical modeling class and discussed statistical modeling, using the Oregon coastal coho salmon population as an example.
    • Stevens presented two seminars at the EPA WED laboratory in November. “The Generalized Random Tessellation Stratified Sampling Design for Selecting Spatially-Balanced Samples” was presented on November 2 and “Local Neighborhood Variance Estimator for GRTS Survey Designs” (with Tony Olsen) was presented November 16, 2004.
    • Stevens has continued working with the Core Development Team for the CRAM for wetland condition. The Core Development Team includes representatives from EPA Region 9, SFEI, the SCCWRP, the California Conservation Core, the California Coastal Commission, and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). The CRAM is modeled on Ohio RAM (ORAM) and is being extended to cover wetland types in California, e.g., salt marshes, and tidal influenced wetlands. In January, Stevens met with the Core Development Team to discuss approaches to calibrating CRAM. The proposed approach was submitted to EPA Region 9 for approval. Calibration will take place in late 2005 through early 2006.
    • Stevens participated and made a presentation in a workshop on Experimental and Survey Design in Fisheries: A Statistics Workshop presented at the annual meeting of the Oregon Chapter of the American Fisheries Society, February 16, 2005.
    • Stevens presented two short courses in 2005. “Statistical Design and Analysis for Environmental Monitoring” was a half-day course presented at the State of the Salmon Conference—2005, Anchorage, AK in April. “Designing Aquatic Resource Surveys” was a full-day course presented in conjunction with the SARMMM conference at Corvallis, OR in September. The primary audience for both courses was aquatic monitoring practitioners in federal, state, and tribal agencies. The Anchorage course had about 15 attendees, and over 60 persons attended the Corvallis course.
    • Stevens participated in the re-design of the monitoring plan for San Francisco Bay as part of a design team consisting of representatives the SFEI, EPA Region 9, DAMARS, USGS, and San Francisco Bay Area Regional Water Resource Control Board. The design is an excellent example of using prior information to guide design. Separate designs were put in place for water column and sediment. The sediment design applies Rotating Panel GRTS methodology. Stevens has been working with SFEI to complete the revision of the report on the redesign of the San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program in response to reviewer comments. The report has now been published and is available at the URL given in the Final Report Summary for R829095 with the complete citation.

YEAR 3 (October 1, 2003 - September 30, 2004)

  • The STARMAP Director invested substantial effort this year in the organization and execution of several meetings having a substantial outreach motivation:
    • EMAP 2004, a session on the statistical aspects of the linkage of Clean Water Act sections 305(b) and 303(d).
    • Graybill Conference, June 16-18, 2004: This constituted outreach to the statistical community, providing STARMAP and DAMARS investigators with an opportunity to present some of their results to both established and young statisticians. It was attended by about 80 statisticians and was officially sponsored by STARMAP. The Director served as editor of a special edition of Environmental and Ecological Statistics, which will serve as the conference proceedings.
    • Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: The Director organized 2.5 days of sessions on the statistical aspects of natural resource surveys. Three STARMAP graduate students made presentations in other sessions.
  • Contacts were made with EPA personnel (Region 8, 9, and 10 and WED/NHEERL/Office of Research and Development [ORD]), and Tribal representatives. Hoeting, Urquhart, and most of the CSU STARMAP-funded graduate students participated in a in a conference on EPA STAR-funded research May 12, 2004. Hoeting and Urquhart made a presentation on STARMAP’s work.
  • Urquhart (STARMAP), Ranalli (STARMAP), and Stevens (DAMARS) participated in the Temporal Sampling Workshop, Port Angeles, WA, November 12-14, 2003, sponsored by the National Park Service.
  • Stevens participated in the Pacific Rim Salmon Monitoring and Protocol Review, Welches, OR, March 8-12, 2004, representing both DAMARS and STARMAP.
  • The STARMAP Director actively recruited high school students into statistics by giving talks to eight advanced placement statistics classes in four high schools, two in Denver and two in Colorado Springs. He also prepared materials for use by teachers of such statistics classes, and talked about them at a statistics teachers conference.

YEAR 2 (October 1, 2002 - September 30, 2003)

  • The first two units of the planned learning materials, on “Why Sample?” and “How to Sample,” were drafted and tested this year.
    • The interface and preliminary content was tested at an evaluation gathering August 13, 2003, at OSU. The findings were used in further implementation of the materials.
    • Personnel affiliated with CSU’s Office of Instructional Services assisted in the development of the materials mentioned above.
  • Tribal needs assessment by Water Quality Technology was completed; a copy was forwarded to EPA/STAR. The report is available on the Web, in the complete output listing in the Final Report Summary for R829095.
  • The STARMAP Director participated in the all-hands meeting of the Atlantic Coastal Ecological Indicator Consortium (ACE INC) Estuarine and Great Lakes (EaGLes) Project in Charleston, SC, May 28-29, 2003.
  • Contacts were made with EPA personnel (Region 8, 9, and 10 and WED/NHEERL/ORD) and Tribal representatives.
  • The STARMAP and DAMARS Directors participated in the EaGLes Conference, Annapolis, MD, December 4-6, 2002. Urquhart gave a talk on metadata and participated in an evaluation of analyses of case studies. The Director of DAMARS participated similarly.
  • The STARMAP Director participated in the conference “Spatial Statistics: Integrating Statistics, GIS, and Statistical Graphics,” held October 17-19, 2002, in Seattle, WA. It was sponsored by the Statistics and Environment Section of the American Statistical Association (ASA) and the National Research Center for Statistics and the Environment.

YEAR 1 (October 1, 2001 - September 30, 2002)

  • Tribal needs assessment continued by Water Quality Technology; three summaries are available. A preliminary report was presented at the CSU conference.
  • Contacts were made with EPA personnel (Region 8 and WED/NHEERL/ORD) and Tribal representatives.

Listing of Specific Outreach Communications

In one sense, all of the outputs of both STARMAP and DAMARS constitute outreach and extension, but to different communities: potential users of the developed methods in the states, tribes, federal agencies, and academics, as well as statisticians and landscape ecologists who might use the methods on behalf of the previously listed clients.

The complete list of outputs from STARMAP, including those originating from Project 4, is available on the Web at http://www.stat.colostate.edu/starmap Exit .

Journal Articles:

No journal articles submitted with this report: View all 59 publications for this subproject

Supplemental Keywords:

outreach, water, watersheds, ecological effects, indicators, aquatic, Bayesian, statistics, survey sampling, EMAP, monitoring distance learning, web-based learning,, RFA, Scientific Discipline, Ecosystem Protection/Environmental Exposure & Risk, Aquatic Ecosystems & Estuarine Research, Aquatic Ecosystem, Environmental Monitoring, EMAP, ecosystem monitoring, spatial and temporal modeling, outreach and training, aquatic ecosystems, water quality, Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program, States and Tribes, modeling ecosystems, STARMAP

Relevant Websites:

http://www.stat.colostate.edu/starmap Exit

Progress and Final Reports:

Original Abstract
  • 2002
  • 2003 Progress Report
  • 2004 Progress Report
  • 2005 Progress Report

  • Main Center Abstract and Reports:

    R829095    Space-Time Aquatic Resources Modeling and Analysis Program (STARMAP)

    Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
    R829095C001 Combining Environmental Data Sets
    R829095C002 Local Inferences from Aquatic Studies
    R829095C003 Development and Evaluation of Aquatic Indicators
    R829095C004 Extension of Expertise on Design and Analysis to States and Tribes
    R829095C005 Integration and Coordination for STARMAP