Project 5 -- Architecture Development and Particle Deposition

EPA Grant Number: R832414C005
Subproject: this is subproject number 005 , established and managed by the Center Director under grant R832414
(EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).

Center: San Joaquin Valley Aerosol Health Effects Research Center (SAHERC)
Center Director: Wexler, Anthony S.
Title: Project 5 -- Architecture Development and Particle Deposition
Investigators: Wexler, Anthony S. , Plopper, Charles
Institution: University of California - Davis
EPA Project Officer: Stacey Katz/Gail Robarge,
Project Period: October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2010 (Extended to September 30, 2011)
RFA: Particulate Matter Research Centers (2004) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Health Effects , Air

Objective:

Epidemiological evidence suggests that children exposed to air pollution develop impaired lungs. We have observed alterations in lung architecture in monkeys exposed to ozone during development. This project will quantify the amount and time course of pollutants that lead to these architectural abnormalities and their functional implications.

Approach:

We will use both experimental and modeling approaches to reach the objectives. Rats will be exposed to ozone, particles, and particles with ozone during different stages of development. We will perform lung function tests and measure airway architecture on normal and exposed adults. Comparing normal and exposed architecture and function will elucidate the significant changes that are due to the pollutants. Particle deposition patterns will also be measured and predicted with mathematical models to understand how alterations in architecture might increase particle deposition or change its location.

Expected Results:

Children and the elderly are thought to be the most susceptible to particulate air pollutant exposure. The elderly are more likely to have pre-existing impairments that make them more likely to suffer symptoms from inhaling particulates, and children respire much more than adults per unit of body mass due to their higher level of physical activity and greater time spent outdoors. The airways in children grow as their bodies grow, and, when exposed to air pollution, the airways appear to grow in ways that lead to diminished lung function. As a result, children who grow up with increased air pollution may be at higher risk when inhaling pollutants as adults. This project will quantify the amounts and kinds of pollutants that lead to airway impairment, determine when the airways are most easily impaired during their development, and identify which functions are impaired due to this exposure.

Publications and Presentations:

Publications have been submitted on this subproject: View all 21 publications for this subprojectView all 111 publications for this center

Journal Articles:

Journal Articles have been submitted on this subproject: View all 13 journal articles for this subprojectView all 48 journal articles for this center

Supplemental Keywords:

aerosol, asthma, ambient air, ozone, exposure, health effects, human health, metabolism, sensitive populations, infants, PAH, metals, oxidants, agriculture, transportation,, RFA, Health, Scientific Discipline, PHYSICAL ASPECTS, Air, ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, particulate matter, Environmental Chemistry, Health Risk Assessment, Risk Assessments, Biochemistry, Physical Processes, Risk Assessment, atmospheric particulate matter, children's health, particle deposition, acute cardiovascular effects, cardiopulmonary responses, chemical characteristics, human health effects, toxicology, airborne particulate matter, animal model, exposure, biological mechanisms, human exposure, PM, particulate matter components, exposure assessment, cardiovascular disease

Progress and Final Reports:

2006 Progress Report
2007 Progress Report
2008 Progress Report
2009 Progress Report
2010 Progress Report
Final Report


Main Center Abstract and Reports:

R832414    San Joaquin Valley Aerosol Health Effects Research Center (SAHERC)

Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
R832414C001 Project 1 -- Pulmonary Metabolic Response
R832414C002 Endothelial Cell Responses to PM—In Vitro and In Vivo
R832414C003 Project 3 -- Inhalation Exposure Assessment of San Joaquin Valley Aerosol
R832414C004 Project 4 -- Transport and Fate Particles
R832414C005 Project 5 -- Architecture Development and Particle Deposition