2007 Progress Report: Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Thyroid Outcomes

EPA Grant Number: R830254
Title: Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Thyroid Outcomes
Investigators: Anderson, Henry A.
Institution: Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services
EPA Project Officer: Chung, Serena
Project Period: March 1, 2003 through February 28, 2007 (Extended to February 28, 2009)
Project Period Covered by this Report: March 1, 2007 through February 29,2008
Project Amount: $2,288,208
RFA: Endocrine Disruptors: Epidemiologic Approaches (2001) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Economics and Decision Sciences , Endocrine Disruptors , Health , Safer Chemicals

Objective:

Measure DDE, PCB and PBDE levels, thyroid parameters, reproductive hormone levels, urinary iodine and hormone concentrations and Hemoglobin A1C in 500 frequent and infrequent sport fish consumers. Based on the study findings, determine whether there is an interaction between fish consumption and endocrine function.

Progress Summary:

Data collection and laboratory analyses of blood serum and urine samples are complete. A screener questionnaire was mailed to a sample cohort of 3,865. Due to a low response rate of 49%, a non-responders survey was developed and a sample of 524 non-responders was drawn in 2005 (this survey had a 50% response rate). Comparison of demographic variables and fish consumption prevalence among participants and non-responders revealed that these two groups were comparable.

Over 600 respondents volunteered to participate by providing blood and urine samples and completing a more detailed health status and fish consumption questionnaire. Five-hundred and twenty-six (526) respondents completed this phase of the study. Lab analyses of the samples were conducted by 3 labs contracted to analyze the serum and urine. The labs conducting analyses included Quest Diagnostics, responsible for testing lipid levels, Northwestern University, responsible for endocrine and thyroid function and Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene, responsible for chemical contaminant levels. Thyroid and hormone levels were measured for 93 ATSDR Repeat Biomarker samples as well. These participants in the ATSDR study were also members of the original Endocrine cohort but did not opt to participate in the Endocrine follow-up study so their stored samples were analyzed instead. Chemical contaminants were already measured as part of the ATSDR study.

All of the follow-up participants have received lab result letters providing DDE and PCB levels and several thyroid and hormone function levels with reference ranges. Survey datasets have been cleaned and quality assurance measures have been applied to the data. Preliminary results have been reported to the EPA by presentation at a STAR grantees meeting and also in a presentation and poster presented at an International Workshop on Brominated Flame Retardants.

Based on preliminary analysis of the data, we have formulated an extension study to explore exposures to PBDEs. Dietary sources did not appear to contribute as heavily to the PBDE body burden as did PCBs and DDE in our cohort. Our extension study, therefore, will focus on non-dietary exposures. Our sample includes all 110 Wisconsin residents who participated in the blood draw and survey for the main Endocrine Study. For those who agree to participate, we will collect the second blood sample to correlate with comprehensive interviews on their home and work environments and contemporaneous measurement of household dust and residential furnishings. We will also be able to compare the serum PBDE results of this second sample with their earlier values to assess longitudinal variability.

Future Activities:

Analysis of survey data and blood serum and urine analyses will continue, as well as comparisons of fish consumption and health status data with the original 1993-94 study. More detailed analysis of follow-up participants and comparisons with earlier studies such as the original 1993-94 study and the ATSDR Original and Repeat Biomarker Studies will begin. The PBDE extension study surveys and sample collection we be completed and analysis of the results will be conducted.


Journal Articles on this Report : 5 Displayed | Download in RIS Format

Other project views: All 54 publications 26 publications in selected types All 25 journal articles
Type Citation Project Document Sources
Journal Article Freels S, Chary LK, Turyk M, Piorkowski J, Mallin K, Dimos J, Anderson H, McCann K, Burse V, Persky V. Congener profiles of occupational PCB exposure versus PCB exposure from fish consumption. Chemosphere 2007;69(3):435-443. R830254 (2007)
R830254 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Science Direct
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  • Other: Science Direct PDF
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  • Journal Article Turyk ME, Anderson HA, Freels S, Chatterton Jr. R, Needham LL, Patterson Jr. DG, Steenport DN, Knobeloch L, Imm P, Persky VW, Great Lakes Consortium. Associations of organochlorines with endogenous hormones in male Great Lakes fish consumers and nonconsumers. Environmental Research 2006;102(3):299-307. R830254 (2005)
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  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: ScienceDirect
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  • Abstract: ScienceDirect
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  • Journal Article Turyk ME, Anderson HA, Persky VW. Relationships of thyroid hormones with polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, furans, and DDE in adults. Environmental Health Perspectives 2007;115(8):1197-1203. R830254 (2007)
    R830254 (Final)
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  • Abstract from PubMed
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  • Journal Article Turyk M, Anderson HA, Hanrahan LP, Falk C, Steenport DN, Needham LL, Patterson Jr. DG, Freels S, Persky V, Great Lakes Consortium. Relationship of serum levels of individual PCB, dioxin, and furan congeners and DDE with Great Lakes sport-caught fish consumption. Environmental Research 2006;100(2):173-183. R830254 (2004)
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    R830254 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Science Direct
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  • Abstract: Science Direct
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  • Journal Article Weisskopf MG, Anderson HA, Hanrahan LP, Kanarek MS, Falk CM, Steenport DM, Draheim LA, Great Lakes Consortium. Maternal exposure to Great Lakes sport-caught fish and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene, but not polychlorinated biphenyls, is associated with reduced birth weight. Environmental Research 2005;97(2):149-162. R830254 (2005)
    R830254 (2006)
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    R830254 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: ScienceDirect
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  • Abstract: ScienceDirect
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  • Other: ScienceDirect PDF
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  • Supplemental Keywords:

    Endocrine, PCB, PBDE, thyroid, sport-fish, hormone, reproductive, RFA, Health, Scientific Discipline, POLLUTANTS/TOXICS, HUMAN HEALTH, Health Risk Assessment, Exposure, Chemicals, Epidemiology, Endocrine Disruptors - Environmental Exposure & Risk, endocrine disruptors, Risk Assessments, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology/Genetics, Endocrine Disruptors - Human Health, chemical exposure, pesticide exposure, fish, endocrine disrupting chemicals, altered sexual development, bioavailability, exposure studies, PCBs, hormone degradation, fish consumption, human exposure, PCB, DDT, human growth and development, groundwater contamination, thyroid, reproductive processes, thyroid function, dietary exposure, agrochemicals, biochemical research, human health risk, epidemiologic studies

    Progress and Final Reports:

    Original Abstract
  • 2003 Progress Report
  • 2004 Progress Report
  • 2005 Progress Report
  • 2006 Progress Report
  • Final Report